The Strength in Relating

By: Abby

My last weekly StrengthsQuest theme post! tear

I love StrengthsQuest!

This week we’ll be discussing the theme: Relator. The person with the Relator theme gets satisfaction from deep, close relationships. They know all sorts of people, and understand how to speak with them, but they have a very close group of friends that they enjoy. This theme pulls you toward people that you already know. It does not mean you’re shy about meeting new people (in fact, you could be like me and have both WOO and Relator and enjoy both!), but you feel very strong and happy when you’re with the people you’re close with.

Relator

A person with Relator as a strengths theme cares about their friends. They want to know their dreams and goals because they want to help them achieve them. When their friends are happy, they get happy.

This person feels that the only relationships that have true value are deep ones. They are very trusting in others.

Here is some relational/career/educational advice for a Relator:

  • When working on a goal or project, involve others. You’ll enjoy it more!
  • Since you tend to be at your best when you are part of a stable group of friends you can trust, join a regular study group in your challenging classes so you can stay motivated to achieve.
  • Learn as much as you can about the people with whom you want to relate. Your interest will be a catalyst for trusting relationships.
  • No matter how busy you are, make time for your friends. They are your fuel.
  • Seek out advisors, counselors, and professors who demonstrate genuine interest in you as a person.
  • Study with friends who have goals similar to yours.
  • Become a mentor and always have a mentor.
  • Get to know professors who take an interest in you.
  • Choose classes that friends are taking. Your relationships with them will heighten your engagement in the classes.
  • Become involved in campus organizations that foster friendships.
  • Talk to your trusted circle of friends about how they see you. Don’t ask them what career they think you should choose; instead, ask them to help you see your greatest talents.
  • Careers in which in-depth, meaningful relationships are valued are likely to be most rewarding to you.
  • Stable work environments where you can work with people you trust but also develop multiple levels of relationships probably will bring out your best.

Read Abby’s other posts

Read other StrengthsQuest posts

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About ellenhatfield

New professional in the field of Student Affairs in Higher Education. I am a Career Counselor at the University of MN Duluth.

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