Tips for Your Teaching Resume

By: Whitney

As a teacher candidate, you might have several positions that sound very similar before you get experience such as student teaching or even your first full-time position. You might have done some assessing or behavior management,  which are great to put on a resume, but since you aren’t taking over the classroom yet. It can be challenging to show all of your experiences without being too repetitive. The following is an example of one way you can avoid this problem as pictured on page 33 of the Career Handbook.

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By combining your positions as a classroom volunteer or a practicum student teacher as pictured above you can give employers the gist of what you did while saving room for other positions you have held, without being too repetitive. If you have two experiences that are very different from one another, this method is not the best option because you likely have very different things to say about each position. For instance, this semester my practicum experience is in a classroom that is 1:1 with iPads. This experience looks VERY different than some of my past experiences where I have been in a very low tech school and in a lower grade. Since these positions are so different, and I would like to highlight how I have used technology in the classroom in my latest experience combining experiences as shown above, is not the best option for my resume.

If you do choose to set up your resume in this way, I would recommend you set it up by similar age groups because assessment and behavior management techniques look very different for kindergarten as compared to 6th grade. I would also recommend to split out special education and general education experiences as these experiences will likely look very different. When using these techniques you may have to be a little more generic with your wording so that it fits with the positions. For instance going off the example above, I wouldn’t say that I worked with three students with a specific learning disability because that statement wouldn’t be true for all positions. Instead, you would list it as the example states above (Assisted teachers in providing consistent classroom management according to individual behavioral needs and plans.) because this is likely accurate information for all of the positions you have listed.

When talking about your student teaching experience, consider having this be a separate description and possibly even give it it’s own section. This is because you spend a lot more time in the classroom when you are student teaching. You also have more responsibility and control over the classroom so this is information you will want to highlight on your resume.

Other really great information pieces to include on your resume are specific details such as whether or not you have done behavioral or academic interventions, stating specific disability groups you have worked with content area topics you have taught, or specific strategies you have used such as guided math, flipped learning, or gamification.

If you can give any data with information such as an intervention, this could make you stand out in a group of applicants, especially if you were successful. If you weren’t successful, this could be a great talking point while in an interview. You could discuss what you tried, what didn’t work, and where you went from there.

By combining similar positions on your resume you can not only reduce repeating yourself over and over, but you can also save yourself space for other positions that are related that you would like to have on your resume. If you choose not to combine positions, make sure you are choosing facts about each position that make it different from the ones you already have on your resume. By spreading out the descriptions you likely do in all experiences, you can give solid descriptions of what you did at each one rather than having your resume be generic. While things like assessment and behavior management are important, so are skills such as using technology and interventions. Make sure that you hit all of these skills in your resume rather than just telling them information that you think employers want to hear. Remember, you want to make yourself stand out by highlighting what kind of teacher you are and where you are going to go in the future!

Read Whitney’s other posts

 

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