Weaving Together a Variety of Experiences

By: Paying

Coming into college in 2016, I knew I wanted to be involved but I didn’t know what exactly I wanted to do. If there was an organization or anything related to editing, I would’ve signed up right away. Throughout the next four years of college, I gained a lot of different experiences here at UMD: Secretary of Hmong Living in Unity and Balance, Peer Educator at Career and Internship Services, International Student Services Orientation Leader, Student Intern at the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and an editor and reporter for The Bark. Outside of UMD, I also completed a summer internship as the Hmong Outreach Intern at The Arc Minnesota. 

With these six experiences that are very different from not only each other but also a career in editing, I struggled to put them all onto one resume and sell myself during an interview for an Editorial Assistant internship. Spoiler alert: I eventually succeeded and was offered the position.

Image: weaving loom with colorful yarn.
Text: weaving together a variety of experiences

In this blog post, I will be sharing my tips on how I weaved together my various experiences to benefit me in a field that didn’t directly relate.

My supervisors, and those I worked with, helped me to shape my experiences so I could have similar responsibilities to editing (editing resumes, editing translations, editing articles, etc). Having a talk with them one on one allowed me to still complete my usual tasks while also picking up extra things around the office.

Another very helpful tip I learned was to focus on the tasks and qualifications on the job posting. That way, you know what you should focus more on and which you can risk leaving out on your resume, either for an individual experience or the tasks you’ve had done. Since you only have a few bullet points you can use to describe what you’ve done, this tip will help filter out would be most valuable to the company and its mission. 

In order to know what to showcase, you need to know what you can showcase. 

Although it might be more work, having a master resume is one of the most helpful things you can do for yourself. On your master resume, you have every possible piece of information that could go on a resume: experiences, bullet point descriptions, projects/researches, skills, activities, etc. This way, when you know what the employer is looking for, you can search through your master resume for those that apply.

Not all employers will be the same and not all resumes will be the same. With these tips, hopefully you can start weaving together your own resume and find the puzzle pieces that fit to make it the best it can be for different employers and for you!

Of Possible Interest:
Resume & Cover Letter – all our blog posts on the topic
Ace the Job Search – our Pinterest boards filled with articles & resources

Read Paying’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Sergio Gonzalez

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