Meet Whitney

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Name: Whitney
Majors: Psychology & Communication
Year in School: Senior
Length of time worked at UMD Career & Internship Services: January 2017
Favorite Place in Duluth: Dannie Duluth’s Consignment
Hobbies: Thrift shopping, kayaking, traveling, bargain hunting, and working on DIY projects

Best career advice I have received: What you want to do for the rest of your life isn’t a fill in the blank, it is a paragraph or essay question. (Basically, life does not need to be figured out all at once, you choose what you do, and you are not required to do one thing for the rest of your life.)

Career Advice: Branch out, discover new things about yourself, skills you have, and things you are interested in. You have many skills and strengths you can bring into anything you do. Put your time, effort, and energy into activities you enjoy and find valuable.

Meet Kimberly

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Name: Kimberly
Major: Management Information System
Minor: Healthcare Management
Year: Junior
When I Started Working at C&IS: Fall 2016
Favorite Place in Duluth: The Lakewalk
Favorite Hobbies: Soccer, Volleyball, and Working Out
Fun Facts: I hate cheese.
Best Career Advice You’ve Received: Explore all the possibilities before you settle on a career.
Piece of Career Advice You Have for Other Students: Experiences is crucial; so never think you have enough.

Internship Search: Writing an Internship Resume

By: Lexi

You’ve found an internship to apply to, now you need to polish up your resume and most likely, a cover letter. Writing resumes for internships are hard because you probably do not have a lot of experience, otherwise, you would not be applying for an internship position. But you still have to find a way to make yourself stand out from the other applicants who also do not have a lot of experience. Hopefully, these tips will help you land that internship you’re hoping for!

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Make your academics section a focus.
This is not saying experience is not important, but since you do not have as much experience make your academics section stick out. Include courses you’ve taken or big projects you’ve worked on. Only put coursework you think the employer will find relevant, though.

Experience included can be paid or unpaid.
Think about the significance and relevance of each opportunity you have partaken in. If you put your part-time job working in the food industry on your resume because that is the work experience you have, go for it, but really think about the skills you gained from the job. Use action verbs to describe your experience. For example, you could say: Maintained and balanced friendly customer service in a fast pace environment. This shows that you have the ability to work in a time efficient manner while preserving good service. Jobs, where you were paid, are important experiences to include, but so are unpaid experiences like volunteering and/or leadership positions. Do not forget to include those too, they will help you stand out! Highlighting your on-campus student organization involvement and leadership can also add to your internship resume.

Read the internship description first.
Read what the employers would expect from an intern and first of all, make sure you have the ability or willingness to learn what they would expect from you. The other reason you should read this before writing your resume is because it can give you an idea of the skill set they are looking for and then you can try to tie in those skills to your resume if you have them. This is another good tip for standing out because you will already have what they are looking for and then they might not have to spend as much time training you in.

Good luck on your internship search and hopefully these tips on how to write an internship resume will help you land the one you want! Remember, Career and Internship Services is more than happy to help look it over and give you further tips! Come to our resume drop-ins on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2-4pm in SCC 22.

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Lexi’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Brandi ReddUnsplash | Brandi Redd

Navigating through College as a First-Generation Student

By: David

As a first-generation student, the struggles and barriers of navigating through college can often be difficult and strenuous. Scholarships, finances, campus resources, college courses, communication with faculty & staff, you name it. So what defines a first-generation college student? Well, according to a research article published by Maietta back in November, she states, “The two most widely used definitions of FG college students are 1) those students whose parents matriculated, but never graduated with a bachelor’s degree and 2) those students whose parents never persisted past a high school diploma.” (Maietta, 2016). My parents came to the U.S. as immigrants after the Vietnam War never achieved a college degree, therefore I, myself, am a first-generation college student. In today’s post, I’ll be highlighting my experience as a first-generation student (FGS) and how I have navigated through college. With that being said, let’s get started!

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Capitalizing on Campus Resources & Opportunities  

The most significant method for me in navigating through college as an FGS was to capitalize on opportunities and resources provided by departments, student organizations, and offices around campus. More than often, I find that students take these opportunities and resources for granted and make zero effort in leveraging these amazing resources to benefit their college career. From my experience in working in various departments and offices around campus, I have come to realize one thing and that is that the folks who work and operate in a campus setting are all dedicated to helping students. In other words, USE YOUR CAMPUS RESOURCES! Check out the amazing opportunities and resources through academic and campus life departments.

Though this is a case where it is easier said than done to actually capitalize on these opportunities and resources, I would like to chime in on my thoughts and feelings as an FGS. Coming into college, I was very hesitant in using and seeking out campus resources and opportunities. One reason was that I simply felt bad for just using the resources available. Personally, I hate the feeling and concept of using someone to benefit myself and that’s exactly how it felt like at first when using these campus resources. To me, it didn’t feel right setting up meetings and appointments to talk over the things that benefitted me only. My turning point with this mentality was when I first got involved with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) in my second semester of my first year. Through a series of activities and meetings with the ODI staff and student organizations, I was able to gain this trust and understanding that staff and faculty alike are here to serve students because they love doing that exactly. Once I understood that, my experiences as an FGS totally flipped 180 degrees for the better.

Connecting with Staff & Faculty

In addition to leveraging campus resources and opportunities, another asset that truly helped me was connecting with the staff and faculty on campus. Setting up to meet with career counselors, attending office hours, asking career related questions, self-disclosing about troubles as an under-representative minority, the list goes on. I cannot recall how many times where I’ve sought out support and guidance from staff and faculty in situations of dilemma. As the first one to attend college, I don’t have many personal connections to rely on in terms of understanding the college life. Thankfully, I’m extremely fortunate to have found a support system that was able to help me navigate through college when I felt stuck and alone in regards to college life. An important thing to keep in mind as an FGS though is that my positive results required me to take action and make the first step in asking staff and faculty members for support. I realize that it was often hard for my faculty members or staff to realize that I was struggling, and therefore required me to put my pride down and ask for help. I think this is common as well in FGS as this sense of pride is something that is often hard to overcome in a college setting. In closing, staff and faculty members are the pillars of support & generators of knowledge and serve as role models & mentors for ALL students and are folks who students seek for motivation and inspiration. From personal to professional development, the staff and faculty members of campus are the keepers of wisdom that guide students to success through moral and academic support.

Conclusion

With that being said, my experiences as an FGS are not limited and exclusive to just campus resources/opportunities and connecting to staff and faculty. Stick around for next time as I’ll continue forth in sharing more personal experiences as a first-generation student. In the next post, one key concept will focus on the importance of social groups and how important it is to have them. Until next time, I urge you to start thinking about your social groups, how you came to establish them, and what role you and your peers serve within the group. As always, stay gold friends!

Of Possible Interest:
Maietta, H. (2016). Unfamiliar Territory: Meeting the Career Development Needs of
First-Generation College Students. National Association of Colleges and Employers Journal.

Read David’s other posts

Navigating Human Resources: Part 2

By: Tori (an HR major!)

“Human Resources isn’t a thing we do. It’s the thing that runs our business.”

If you read my previous blog post, you are well aware that human resources is what brings business and people together. But how do you know if this is a good career for you?

Back in the day (just a mere two years ago), I came into the Career & Internship Services office to take the Strong Interest Inventory assessment, which helps determine what occupations may be best for you based off of your interests. Human Resource Management (HRM) was in my top ten and it was during this time I began taking the possibility of majoring in Human Resource Management seriously. Fast forward to a few months ago, when I took the StrengthsQuest assessment to figure out what qualities I naturally excel in and can use to market myself. This is when I began seeing HRM in who I was and who I wanted to be.

navigating-hr

Below are my top 5 strengths and how they relate to Human Resources:

My top strength is woo. This comes from my love of meeting new people and winning them over. I enjoy breaking the ice and making a connection with other people. While this has always been something that came naturally to me, I didn’t realize how much woo plays into the role of recruiter. One of my career goals after graduation is to become a company recruiter through which I can connect with college students, win them over for my company, and help them reach their goals.

My second strength is positivity. Those with positivity tend to have an enthusiasm that is contagious; they are upbeat and can get others excited about what they are going to do. My other area of interest in HR is training and development. If I want to get people on board with spending days, weeks, or months learning new skills and making new goals, I need to have a positive attitude and make it a fun experience for everyone.

My third strength is empathy, meaning I can sense the feelings of other people by imagining myself in their situation. Empathy is an important strength to have if you are going to be working with a diverse group of people. Through empathy, I can connect, relate, and understand others’ situations as their manager. Being able to put myself in the starting place of another person and work with them toward the next step is a valuable tool to have.

My fourth strength is includer. Someone who is an includer shows awareness of those who may feel left out and makes an effort to include them and accept them. Part of human resources is solidifying culture within a company. What do employees want? What makes them feel valued? How can we accomplish our goals and still provide a friendly, encouraging work environment? My strength of includer helps me value and view company culture on a different level than most and provides opportunities for me as a human resource manager.

My fifth strength is developer. As a developer, I recognize and cultivate the potential in others, and as a manager, I lead and navigate a group of people. Putting others in positions that empower them and make the business run smoothly is part of not only a manager’s job but also human resources. This strength helps me lead others into roles and opportunities they desire.

Come into the office and learn your strengths! Like me, they may help you visualize your future career and find what areas you can excel in!

Read more about STRENGTHS

Read Tori’s other posts

Photo source: Unsplash | Adam Przewoski

The Right Time To Be a Quitter- How to Act After You Quit

By: Willow

Now you’ve quit your job, take a deep breath. You were professional, you were to the point, you rocked it. So what do you do now?

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People will ask you why you quit your job, and you have a few options of how to respond:

You can lie.
I don’t recommend this one, at all. Lies always come back to bite you in bum.

You can tell the entire truth.
I don’t recommend this one either, most of the time. Just like imagining your desk flipping quitting scenario, telling a couple trusted friends or family members is therapeutic. Tell your mom, bff, significant other, or another trusted member of your inner circle. If you’re struggling to find someone to talk to make an appointment with a counselor at health services, honestly, even just one session could really help. Get out all the dirt, get out all your anger to someone you can trust, whoever that is. Why shouldn’t you tell the whole truth the whole time? There are a couple reasons: It makes you feel angry. Whenever I think about quitting my job I get upset, I don’t like being upset, it’s not fun for me, it won’t be fun for you. Another reason, you don’t want to be the person known for hating on their old boss. You might think it doesn’t matter, you’re only telling the truth, who cares? Things get around, I’m sure you know that. You never know who might be around to remember you as the jerk who couldn’t shut up about their old boss.

You can the short version of the truth.
I am not condoning lying in this post. I would like to repeat that, I am not telling you to lie. You can say something like, “It wasn’t a good fit.” Or, “It was time for a change.” If those things are true, they are perfectly valid answers. Remember, you don’t owe a detailed explanation to anyone. Some people may try to pry a drama filled story out of you, don’t let them. You’re also allowed to tell anyone who asks that you don’t want to talk about it, that is fine too. The big thing here is that even when you’re telling the truth it could still come off as bashing your boss, which is a huge no-no in the professional world. It’s another one of those things that will come back and bite you in the bum.

Remember that you had your reasons for quitting, and you made the right choice. Keep your head up, and take the high road. I believe in you.

Read the rest of the series: 

Read Willow’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Geran de Klerk

Saving Your Job Searches: GoldPASS Edition

Editor’s note: While this post talks about saving “job” searches, the same tips apply to internship searches.

By: David

Say you find a list of awesome job postings on GoldPASS, but your 2 o’clock obligation is in five minutes. Yet, you have no idea what you entered to compile such an awesome list. Lucky for you, there is a magic button in GoldPASS that allows you to save your searches. Today’s post will be centered on the importance of saved searches. I cannot recall how many times saved searches have…well…saved me from scuffling and shuffling through a website to find the job postings that I was dying to apply for. Many job posting websites have various ways to go about the saved search process, but today I’ll show you the simple way to go about it through GoldPASS. Let’s begin!

GoldPASS
Before jumping in, it’s important to know that GoldPASS can get quite hefty in terms of the amount of job openings that are posted on a regular basis. With this in mind, it’s important to save your searches in GoldPASS before your desired posts get lost in the vast sea of job openings, which is not a pleasant scenario when applying for jobs. Assuming that you already know how to apply and look for positions on GoldPASS, I’ll briefly go over it again in Step 1 and then jump straight into the saving your search process. Fortunately, if you don’t have experience with finding positions on GoldPASS, you can read all about it in a previous blog post, How to Apply for a Position in GoldPASS.

Step 1: Entering KeyWords
So the first step you always want to do is to fill out your desired sections for a job search. To narrow down your search, add specific information and leverage the advanced search option (which I already have opened at the bottom of the image) to better filter your options. A good tip for GoldPASS job searches is to NOT fill out every single section as too many filters can lead you to zero postings.

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Step 2: The Magic Button: “Save Search”
Next up is the holy, magic button: save search. By looking at the image, you can see on the right-hand side where the red arrow is pointing to save your search.

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Step 3: Entering a name for the search
Upon clicking the button, a small window like this will pop up which will direct you to place a name to represent the search. In this case, I’ve decided to name it “Full-Time Entry Level” as I am looking for full-time entry level positions after graduation.

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Step 4: I want to…
Now that you have your search saved, you can always come back to it. In order to do so, go to the “I want to…” button on the left-hand side of GoldPASS as indicated in the screenshot below.

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Upon clicking on the button, it will expand and look something like this (see below). To clarify, you will have to click the “Saved Searches” button to further expand the list of searches that you have saved. From there, you will see the names appear in which you have given a name to each specific search option such as “Full-Time Entry Level” as I have in the previous step.

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Step 5: Voila!
And there you have it! A five-step process to saving your searches on GoldPASS. Every time you click your saved search options (Full-Time Entry Level, etc.) you will be redirected to the keywords that were saved under that specific category.

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Conclusion
Before leaving, now that you know how to save your searches on GoldPASS, I would highly recommend for you to take this concept of saved searches with you wherever online you decide to apply for jobs. Searching for jobs can get messy at times and it’s never fun having to constantly start from square one. So always, always, ALWAYS save your job searches or at least keep track of them when searching. Till then, keep saving those searches and as always, stay gold.

Read David’s other posts