Logan’s Final Thoughts

By: Logan

Editor’s note: This is Logan’s final (tears!) post as a consistent author on the blog. He wrote this up about a month ago as school was ending for the semester. Enjoy!

I have finally made it. I am sitting here on the Thursday of Finals Week, done with college forever. It really is a bittersweet feeling. I have had so many great memories and so much fun, but I am also extremely excited to move on to the next phase of my life. This past week I have been thinking about the last four years and just how much I have learned, as well as how much I have changed. When I first started college I had no idea where I would be in four years, and I couldn’t be happier with the result.

Flashback to me as a freshman, wide-eyed and eager to learn. I began as an Exercise Science major and wasn’t sure what I really wanted to do. It is interesting to see I ended up going a completely different way with my career. My major changed to psychology and I declared a minor in sociology. As far as my field of work I will be working for a transportation company in their operations department. Four years ago I probably could not have even imagined myself doing something like this, but we change a lot in four years.

Personality wise, I believe I have changed a lot as well. As a freshman, I was far more concerned with my activities and organizations than I was with my academic and work life. It seemed like meeting new people and enjoying myself was the main concern. This isn’t all bad, I met a lot of people and made a lot of connections, which is important. As time went along, my focus shifted to my schoolwork and work performance. My GPA rose, and I put more time and effort into my work. I learned many skills on how to present myself professionally and about business etiquette, and I have the counselors at Career and Internship Services to thank for that. I believe when I first came into college I was much more carefree. I am still a relaxed person overall, but I understand I need to get things done in a timely manner before engaging in social activities.

Over these last few years, I feel like I have grown a strong social network, which I am quite proud of. I gained a lot of connections while I was in a fraternity for 3 semesters, I met a lot of students and staff through my work at Career and Internship Services, and I met a lot of great friends just by trying out new friend groups and not limiting myself. I am glad I interacted with so many people because once I leave this place I want people to remember me.

I think this is the most important thing I have learned in college. Sometimes when we start school we believe we must have everything planned out. We think we need to have a set major and career path declared as soon as possible. I have learned this is not how it works. College is a learning experience and you will not know what you like until you try it. I think some of my best decisions have been when I have went out of my comfort zone and tried new things and I have many examples of this. A large contributor to declaring psych as my major was trying out random psychology electives. I knew nothing about psych, but I tried something new and loved it. Do not limit yourself, try things you never expected yourself to try!

I think we all change a bit in college. We get to find out who we really are and what we like. This is one thing I have learned about myself. In high school, I felt like I had to act like who everyone wanted me to be. In college, I have realized you can honestly be yourself and you do not have to care about what other people think. College is far less judgmental and there is really a place for everyone. So go out of your comfort zone, be yourself, and enjoy your college years because, sadly, it doesn’t last forever.

Read Logan’s other posts

Finally Getting the Internship

By: Cassie

If you have read my last few posts, you’ll remember how I’ve been really struggling to get an internship. Well, I thought you should know I did the impossible! I finally lined up an internship for this upcoming fall and let me tell you it feels SO good. I am definitely not trying to rub it in anyone’s face, I am just here to tell you the hard work did pay off. Here are a few tips that I can give you about finally clinching that internship.

Don’t get discouraged!
Yes, it is a long process. Yes, you’re going to be frustrated. Yes, you are going to get emails and phone calls explaining why you didn’t get the position. BUT, you have to use these things to make you stronger. You have to adjust your thinking to really see the positives of the situation. If you don’t get a position you really wanted, use that as motivation for the future and apply for the next year. If you don’t have enough experience, make sure you really start putting yourself out there. You can do it, just don’t let it get you down if you don’t get it on your first try.

NETWORKING, NETWORKING, NETWORKING
You probably get this pounded into your head by all of your professors, counselors, parents, and peers. Well, you know what, THEY ARE RIGHT. LISTEN TO THEM. I was able to get my internship by going to my professor’s office hours. He got to know me and then remembered he knew someone who has been working in the field I would like to go into. A couple emails later and I was in their office for an interview. NEVER turn down the ability to get your name out there and ALWAYS put your best foot forward.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help!
It is a tough process and getting help can really give you a new perspective on the situation. By talking through the process with one of our counselors, one of your peers, or a professor you have a good relationship with can be really beneficial. Sometimes you just need to be reminded of how awesome you really are!

Make sure to say thank you!
Going back to my last point, definitely use those around you as a support system – but never forget to say thank you! Say thank you to all the people who help you along the way to show how much you truly appreciate what they did! Also, make sure to say thank you to the companies and people you reach out to, even if they say no, to show that you are grateful for their time and effort! A little thank you email, call, or letter goes a long way!

Hopefully, these tips help! I am always here to talk you through the process and so is everyone here at Career and Internship Services! We want you to succeed and we know you can! So go get those internships Bulldogs! We believe in you!

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Cassie’s other posts

Career Counseling Internship

By: Whitney

As the semester is winding down, so is my internship, sadly. Luckily, I will be back next year filling another role in the office. Here is a glimpse into my journey as a C&IS intern.

WHY I CHOSE TO INTERN
There are many reasons I chose to do an internship for credit this semester. Number one, I wanted to gain experience in a psychology related field to assess if I really wanted to go into this field. Number two, with all the other demands of being a college student, I knew if I didn’t have a class to help me set deadlines and keep on track in the process of actually getting the internship I probably wouldn’t prioritize it. In my wildest dreams, I never thought I would be interning in Career Counseling, I started my degree wanting to go into human services with children and families. Going through college, however, I started to get to know myself more, take on challenges, and grow. One of these opportunities was my role as a peer mentor for transfer students. After being involved with that program I realized that I was open to working with a broader range of people than only children and that I really enjoyed working with college students. I followed my interests, discovered this internship through the psychology department, and the rest is history.

WHAT I LOVED ABOUT IT
What I’ll miss most about it (at least while I’m gone over the summer) is the people. I spent about nine hours a week with the employees of the C&IS office and I loved getting to know them! The professional relationships you build with co-workers is important for way more than just networking. They are what makes up the work environment and office culture. Every workplace is unique. With C&IS office I think I hit the jackpot. The office is very open and welcoming, I would describe it as being a “professional family.” I looked forward to coming to work because I enjoyed the work I was doing and the people I was doing the work with. If I had one without the other it would have been incomplete. In the 40-hour-work-week world, office culture becomes even more important.

CHALLENGES AND ADVICE I WOULD GIVE MYSELF
The first few days in a new job are always a little nerve-wracking, soon enough though I got to know people in the office and settled into my role. At first, I wasn’t sure exactly what it would look like. Looking back on my experiences I would tell myself to jump into my role sooner even if I was a little unsure. I would also tell myself to ask about shadowing career counseling appointments and set them up earlier on in the internship.

Keep respectful communication between you and your supervisors, let them know what you are hoping to learn through the experience and collaborate on how to make it happen. Advocating for yourself is important, employees are busy and sometimes you need to ask if you could join in on something rather than waiting for someone to suggest it for you. And remember, you are there to learn. It’s fine to ask questions if you have them, just don’t hound people with questions.

Sometimes things are a little outside your comfort zone. Prime example: me writing for the C&IS blog. It can be tough to put your work out there for people to read, because who knows how it will be received. I also have never written for a blog before, much less one tied to an official organization. My advice would be to jump on those opportunities anyway because they could lead to something amazing.

CAREER COUNSELING
Another main reason I wanted to intern with C&IS was to see if career counseling and/or higher ed were fields I could see myself going into in the future. What is the profession like? What is it all about? I learned there is a lot of behind the scenes work that goes on in a career counseling office, from setting up and attending job fairs, to classes and presentations, to making sure C&IS is providing their clients with the help that they are seeking. I also learned that there is so much to know as a career counselor and it is not possible to know it all. Which just means that if an answer is unknown they put on their sleuthing hats and help the client find the needed info.

Another thing to mention, we are not alone if we ever feel anxious about our career journey or what decisions to make. We are all in the same boat with that, and while career counselors can’t tell you what exactly to do with “the rest of your life,” they can certainly help you clarify what is important to you at this point in your life and assist you in assessing your options.

CONCLUSION
Internships can be a fantastic way to gain an understanding of what you want to do in your future career and even not so great experiences can teach you this as well. I really enjoyed my internship and I discovered that career counseling is something I could see myself doing in the future. It pushed me a little out of my comfort zone at times, helped me grow in confidence in my ability to navigate being a part of the professional working world and allowed me to meet some wonderful people and make some fond memories!

Of Possible Interest

Read Whitney’s other posts

Letter to Freshman Me

By: Kimberly

As a Junior now in college there are a handful of things I wish I would have known or been told earlier in my college career. Especially when I didn’t have anyone in my primary family who completed any form of college, I had very limited resources to go to for assistance. So yes, I will admit if there was such a thing as a time machine, this is something that would be on my list to do when I travel back. I would drop this letter off to myself in hopes that it will save me from a few breakdowns and long nights. Now, I’m not saying that I had the worst experience or that it wasn’t the best thing that I went through but I still could’ve used these reminders.

Dear Freshman Me,

It’s future you, now in your junior year almost finished with college. You probably will thank yourself after you finish reading this letter but don’t take all the credit, because you’ll know who to thank once you meet them in your journey. For starters let me just reassure you this,

  1. You don’t always have to have everything figure out months before you get there and that’s completely fine.
  2. You may struggle here and there with a few courses. Not because you aren’t smart, but because sometimes it’s inevitable. It’s just one of those courses that will try to bring you down, but it doesn’t define you.
  3. You’re also going to need to step out of that bubble more often. Try new things and make new connections. It’s not as scary as you think.
  4. Most importantly, this is your learning process where you are supposed to make mistakes, it is fine if you don’t always get things right because you are still growing, learning, and most of it all getting to know who you are. (But that doesn’t mean every mistake has an excuse!)

Now you probably wondering, what in those four points have anything to do with the other people who you will encounter? Let’s just say you’ll have to do a bit more than reading this letter. If you happen to go through the campus “wedge” make sure you pay extra attention to both sides of the hall, or if you just try emailing and reaching out to others they are more than willing to help. Also in the wedge, there’s this office that offers these “assessments” you’ll eventually find out about and take, which will give you some more reassurance. You’ll also be surprised to know that your professors would like it if you go to their office hours. It doesn’t even have to be for help but because you can build good relationships with them. A little birdy even told me they have connections with employers.

So, save the breakdowns. I can’t give away everything to you because, if I did, that wouldn’t be nearly as helpful as letting you learn for yourself too. With this, seek out your resources even if that means having to do a little extra work and know that there is no such thing as a “norm” in college. Everyone has their own path at their own pace.

Sincerely,
You

Of Possible Interest:
Navigating Through College as a First-Generation Student Part 1 & Part 2

Read Kimberly’s other posts

Procrastination. Why do we do this to Ourselves?

By: Lexi

Finals are quickly approaching and you’re probably feeling extremely stressed about all of the work you have to get done in the next week. Then you think about it more and realize a good chunk of that homework could have been done much earlier, which would have eliminated a lot of your current stress, then you start to stress out more about how stressed out you are. Trust me, you are not alone! Do not fret, procrastination is going to happen when you are in college. Sometimes it is hard to balance your social life with your school life, and probably a job on top of all that! Procrastination is going to happen so here are some suggestions on how to handle it.

Plan ahead. It is kind of hard to do this now since it near the end of the semester, but make it a goal for next semester. Write down your assignments and their due dates right when you find out about them. If you need to, go out and buy yourself a planner. Physically writing down your deadlines may make you realize how soon the deadlines could actually be and then maybe you will start them earlier.

Start with the hardest task. If you start with your hardest task then it will just make it that much easier to keep going on assignments. Plus, if you get the worst task out of the way you will be able to feel relieved and hopefully focus better on the next tasks to come.

Change your study environment. Maybe the reason you are not getting enough done during your study time is because of your environment. Look at where you currently study area; Is it loud? Is it messy? Are your friends present? Is there a tv or other electronics? All of these factors can affect your procrastination. Possibly try hitting the library by yourself instead of your couch while watching tv.

Don’t blow a task out of proportion. Putting off easy tasks will make it seem harder, so first of all, do not do this. But you probably will so try to remember that it really won’t take as long as you are expecting it to. Stop thinking about it and just do it.

Lastly, just do it. This goes along with my last point, but stop thinking about all the work you have to do and just get it done. Instead of saying yes to getting ice cream with a friend to eat your stress away, invite them to get coffee and hit the library. This will help you and your friend. Chances are that once you are at the library and grinding away you won’t feel as stressed.

Even this blog post took me longer than necessary to write (which could be a cause of me procrastinating by scrolling Facebook and finding this hilarious video). Unfortunately, I procrastinate too. So get off of Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, turn off Netflix and stop playing bike race and do your work! You do not have much time left before it is too late. But remember to breathe, exercise, laugh, take study breaks and remember these tips. You will make it and if you are graduating, congrats, good luck and remember to not procrastinate your job applications!

Read Lexi’s other posts

“Hanging” Up the Mantle: Leadership Transitioning

With graduation around the corner, it’s crazy to see so many years go by with a blink of an eye and detach myself from the college environment. It’s a scary, yet exciting thought, and deep down, I know I’ll truly miss college and the opportunities that come with it. One aspect I know I will for sure miss once I leave the college bubble is campus involvement and holding leadership roles. Before giving a preview on today’s post, I just wanted to put this out there that the title is intentional. Since we’re all so familiar with the “taking up the mantle” idiom, I figured I would throw in a twist by titling this post, “hanging up the mantle” which essentially is supposed to represent stepping down as a leader. (Clever, I know!) With that being said, in today’s post, I will be focusing on my experiences of stepping down from leadership roles and what are ways and questions a student can ease the transition of going from super-duper involved on-campus to the “boring, dull” lifestyle in the real-world. Well then, let’s dive in!

Stepping Down from Leadership Positions
From personal experience, I think one of the most difficult aspects of being a leader is not the stress that comes with leading nor is it the backlash and criticism you get from people, but rather the moment when you realize it’s time to step down. The moment when you realize that your dreams, goals, and vision as a leader will diminish is unsettling. (Okay, it’s not that extreme, there are successors for a reason!) On the contrary, I think some individuals may feel differently and fathom the relief that comes with stepping down more than anything, which is understandable too.

From my own experience, this was especially relevant in my active membership with Asian Pacific American Association (APAA). I’m sure by now, you perhaps are aware of APAA from my previous blog posts. As an active member and previous board member, I recall there being moments where I wasn’t ready to let go and still wanted to be involved and contribute to the organization as best I could. Eventually, I realized the importance of letting go and restraining myself and ultimately how important it was to simply believe in the new generation of leaders with their ideas and beliefs in regards to taking care the organization. Granted, I was still involved with the organization, it’s just that getting involved looked a lot different. For any leader, really, it’s difficult when you’ve invested so much time and effort into an organization and literally have attached yourself to it whether it be mentally, emotionally, or spiritually. An important part of stepping down for me, I’ve realized, is that being a leader doesn’t always have to mean that you’re in the front line leading the charge. It can also mean staying behind and helping others rise to positions of leadership. As part of leaving the college bubble and launching into the real world, I know the best thing I can do as a leader with previous experience is to give back to the next generation of leaders. As my time of leading has come to an end, I’ve realized that part of stepping down is inspiring and guiding others to step up.

The Actual Transition
I think any student who is or has been involved on campus and served in a leadership role knows that time flies by all too fast when having to balance, school, work, and extracurricular activities such as leadership positions. Especially for graduating seniors, this creates more issues as finding a job only creates more chaos. But what happens when a person goes from planning, studying, working, organizing, eating, sleeping, job-hunting, and exercising, to simply just working? I think this is a reality that many students face as the fluid nature of college switches to the routine-based lifestyle of working after graduation.

Honestly, I, myself, have not gotten the chance to let the idea of graduation settle in due to the busy nature of college itself. With having conversations with career counselors and peers, I’ve only had the chance to ponder on it slightly, but the thought of going from busy to boring is quite depressing honestly. As I navigate these last few weeks of college before graduation, it’ll be smart for me to prepare the transition from college to the working world. Granted, I’ll still be doing summer research in the Twin Ports area, but I think preparing mentally and emotionally to slowly transition out of college will be a real challenge. Of course, I don’t have all the answers to ease the transition as I am still in the process of doing so, but I think it’s important for any college student to just be aware and mentally/emotionally prepared to leave college.

But hey, there’s hope! Just because college is ending doesn’t necessarily mean that getting involved has to end as well. As young professionals stepping into the real world, the chance to get involved in the community is endless and the opportunity to network is even greater than what the college level has to offer. For instance, there are a number of organizations dedicated to serve and connect young professionals. On a local level, the Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce offers a number of opportunities for professionals both young and old. Additionally, if you have certain special interests and causes that you would like to advocate for, there are even more opportunities. Personally, I’ve been looking forward to getting involved with two different organizations after I graduate: Coalition of Asian American Leaders & National Association of Asian American Professionals. Ultimately, I see college as a unique stepping stone for students to get active in their communities. If student leaders are able to translate the work that they’ve put it in at the university level into their communities afterward, just imagine the positive impact and change that can occur in the world.

Conclusion
So where do we go from here with zero motivation to study, “senior slide” kicking in if it hasn’t already, and the struggles of going from college-life to the real world? Well, if I told you I have all the right answers, I would be lying. I think the important piece is to simply reflect on the time in college and enjoy the last few moments before it all ends. Furthermore, ask questions and have conversations with professionals and staff who work with students who go through this transition such as career counselors, advisors, etc. I know for myself, my supervisor, Ellen, has pushed me to seek out opportunities past the college bubble and to consider ways of still getting involved in the working world. For many, a lot of individuals are ready and can’t wait to fly off into the real world, and for the very few like myself, it’ll be a bittersweet ending leaving the college life and the opportunities and activities that came with it. Like I said before, if student leaders were able to make a great impact at the college level, imagine the potential for growth and positive change in the future once this effort is transferred to our communities whether that be on a local, regional, national, or international level. So what are you waiting for? Get out there and change the world (for the better, of course) graduates!

 

Read David’s other posts

How to Say NO.

By: Tori

I tend to say yes to a lot of things.

“Tori will you…?”
“Tori can you….?”
“Tori want to come…?”

And even when I know I should be saying no, I find myself saying yes. This happens every day, at school, at work, and even at home.

Throughout these past 3 years of independence and self-reliance, I’ve learned I don’t know my “limits” until it’s too late to say “no” and then I’m overwhelmed with the list of things I said “yes” to.

With the ‘end of semester stress’ suffocating many of us, I figured it would be useful to learn how to say no and understand the reasons behind why it is SO hard to do this sometimes.

Below are helpful tools you can use to say no.

Acknowledge that you can’t do everything.

  • This is a hard statement to take in, but it is true. You cannot do everything, I cannot do everything, No one can do everything. This means that sometimes you HAVE to say no. Understanding the limits of what you can and cannot do is important.
  • It is even more important to know when to say no because you don’t have time to always say yes. Time management is everything.

Understand you aren’t being selfish

  • Know you are not being selfish when you say no, you are allowed to say no to certain requests and situations if it is better for you.

Know you can’t please everyone

  • We are people pleasers at our core; we desire for everyone we meet to like us, but this is unrealistic.
  • We cannot do things because we want others to like us, or because we want the reputation of “being the best” coworker, student, daughter/son/child, or friend.
  • Saying yes just to gain recognition by others is putting value in something that will not satisfy and your work will not live up to your expectations.

Be direct; Say “No, I can’t” or “No, I don’t want to”

  • Remember that it is better to say no now than be resentful later.
  • Don’t say “I’ll think about it” if you don’t want to do it. This will just prolong the situation and make you feel even more stressed.

Give a brief explanation
You don’t have to lie or make up excuses to say no, just simply be honest. If you have a reason for not wanting or being able to do something, give them a brief explanation. Below are a few examples:

  • “I don’t think I can take on another project, as I am already working on…..”
  • “I can’t go out to eat because I need to save money.”
  • “I can’t go to the party because I need a night to relax by myself.”

Suggest alternatives
When it comes to wanting to say yes, but not being able to, suggest an alternative plan or action. This may look something like:

  • “I can’t go to the party because I need a night to relax. If you want, you can come watch movies with me.”
  • I don’t think I can take another project, but maybe Sarah would be good for this one, she has a lot of interest in this area.”

I hope this helps you reflect and have confidence in saying no the next time you feel yes at the tip of your tongue. As life gets busier, it is necessary to know your own limits!

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Tori’s other posts