Meet Heidi

Heidi headshot

Name: Heidi
Major: Marketing
Minor: Communication
Year in school: Junior
When I  started working at UMD Career & Internship Services: August 2017
Favorite place in Duluth: Park Point Beach, especially during the summer!
Favorite hobby: Dance Fitness

Best career advice I’ve received: “Learn to trust your own brilliance, go with your gut, and believe that you have something uniquely amazing to deliver to this world – because you do.” ~ Cara Alwill Leyba

Piece of career advice you have for other students:
Make the effort to get involved on campus. There is so much to learn from other students and you never know the awesome friendships you can build from becoming involved. There are so many recourses that campus has to offer so take advantage of them!

Self-Care 101

By: Alissa (Disability Specialist & Guest Blogger)

Editor’s Note: Today’s post continues the collaboration we are doing with the Disability Resources office on the UMD Campus.

Hi there everyone, Alissa here from UMD Disability Resources returning to post some helpful tips on one of my favorite topics ever, SELF-CARE. You might be thinking, oh but I am so busy and I don’t really have time for self-care? Then chances are, you could probably really use some 😉 Ask yourself: “What have I done today that feels nourishing, supportive and inspiring for my well being, my joy?”

In this post, I am going to focus on some helpful self-care tips I like to practice along with other helpful tips that may be useful for yourself. Beginning to practice self-care, you need to remind yourself that you truly deserve it and you are WORTH it.

Self-care simply speaking is basically any set of practices that make you feel rejuvenated, relaxed, or nourished in either a physical, emotional, spiritual, or all of the above state of mind! Self-care is simply putting time aside to recharge in a way that is really meaningful and helpful to you and there are ton of different ways to do so.

For me personally, some of my favorite self-care activities are practicing mindfulness meditation, yoga, exercise, walking and playing with my dogs, taking a bubble bath, and simply curling up on the couch to watch some of my favorite tv shows.

One of the biggest hurdles to practicing self-care is basically figuring out what works for you as it is something we naturally don’t think about as much as other life duties and responsibilities. We need to make self-care a priority just as we do brushing our teeth or making our beds in the morning. Self-care should be a part of your daily routine. One way to think through a self-care plan is to ask yourself who, what, and where make you feel safe and supported.

Some other important questions to think about are: Who are the people that you can surround yourself with who will make you feel supported? What are some activities that you can do that bring you a sense of calm, and where are the places that you can go to feel safe and comfortable?

Here’s how to start your self-care practice:

  • Start Small. If you don’t already have a self-care regimen in place for yourself, remember to start small. Savor a cup of tea quietly, listen to your breath for 5 minutes each day, walk out in nature, take a bubble bath, or play with a pet. These can all be small, yet meaningful ways to take care of yourself.
  • Put Yourself First. You can’t give to others if you don’t first give to yourself. If you are wearing yourself ragged, you will be giving to others from a very fragile and sensitive place. It will likely be with agitation, frustration, fatigue, and even stress.
  • Adjust accordingly. Because self-care is not a one-size-fits-all reality, and individual needs vary, we have to be willing to adjust and readjust our needs and priorities along the way. Remember self-care is a practice that is ongoing, lifelong, and requires constant attention and intention. Some days will be easy, other days will feel impossible.

If you can do one thing (at minimum) every day that rejuvenates you, then these baby steps can really add up! I know you can do it! Always put yourself first and prioritize YOU. Self love is very important, you got this!

Of Possible Interest: 

Read other posts Alissa has written

 

Turning Your Internship Into a Job

By: Whitney

Once upon a time, I wrote a blog post about my experience as the C&IS Intern. After loving my internship, I was reluctant to leave, so I’m back in a new role at the front desk! If you are going into an internship or want to turn your internship into a job, I’ve highlighted a few tips below to help you capitalize on this opportunity. Forbes and The Wishington Post (Washington Intern Student Housing) have also offered up some tips so that you can turn your internship into a job as well.

Transitioning your internship into a job truly starts with your internship. Ever heard sayings like “an internship is really just a drawn-out interview”? The heart of the matter is that how you behave as an intern is an indication to your supervisor and co-workers what it may be like to work with you as official staff. The process of being an intern doesn’t need to be as nerve-wracking as an interview, however.

TIPS

  1. Your internship IS your job. This means doing things like showing up on time consistently, dressing the part, and saying goodbye to personal social media while at work. Being new in any job has its moments of discomfort, but chances are you have been building these foundational skills for professionalism for years before this.
  2. Get to know all of your colleagues and fellow interns. This is code for networking. This part is scariest for me. In my first real job, my workplace would occasionally hold picnics for the daycare staff, students, and their families to attend. I was never required to go, but wish that I would have. Going would have given me an opportunity to build stronger relationships with the parents and staff, instead of simply knowing them on a more superficial level. Working together means seeing those people every day for a number of months, or years, so working becomes its own community (a professional one). Doing so will make you a part of the office and is also helpful in getting a job post-internship.
  3. One of the things The Wishington Post recommended, is to have a professional mentor within the workplace. Someone you feel comfortable with that can help you transition between student intern to employee. In my internship, that person was mainly my site supervisor. She was a great person to ask questions of and helped me to make sure I was learning about the field as well as the specific areas I was interested in.
  4. Ask questions and take initiative. Sometimes people don’t ask questions for fear of looking incompetent, but good question asking shows that you are interested and willing to learn. Asking about opportunities is something that can help you in and outside of your internship. Instead of waiting for work to be handed to you ask to be involved, without overexerting yourself. Forbes suggests you familiarize yourself with other departments as well. This may be helpful if, like me, your job ends up being a slightly different role than your internship. Asking about additional opportunities after my internship is how I found out about the front desk.

If you have an internship, congratulations! Know that the company chose you as much as you chose to work for the company. You are there to learn and also have many valuable skills to bring to the table! Your work as an intern is important.

And because I am such a fan of motivational quotes here is one to inspire you:
“It always seems impossible until it’s done”—Nelson Mandela

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Whitney’s other posts

If You’re Afraid of Networking then You’re Doing it WRONG

By: McKenzie

TRUE/FALSE: Networking is shady.
ANSWER: FALSE

TRUE/FALSE: Networking is scary.
ANSWER: FALSE

It came as a shock to me when I learned that many people I know perceive networking as a scary or shady activity. As I watched my colleagues engage with peers, professors, and community members I began to wonder, “Why do people associate such negativity with networking?”. Is the issue rooted in our fear of being rejected or possibly the media’s portrayal of the way to the top being a competitive game of knocking down others? I cannot say for certain where this fear comes from, however, I can say this: You are almost ALWAYS networking.

Networking. It's kind of a big deal.

I want you to think of your average day. Imagine yourself at your job or if you’re a student picture yourself at school. Consider all of the tasks you will complete, but more importantly, think about all the people who you have come into contact with today. Networking is not scary because we do it all the time. When the average person thinks about networking they often draw up images of stiff “networking” events where everyone stands locked to the wall staring anxiously at each other like middle schoolers at a dance. You came. You did nothing. You left. And you probably didn’t get much out of it. But the reality is that we are constantly networking. Unless you work from home and don’t contact anyone beyond sending your work in or you live a life of complete isolation, you are always creating contacts.

The hardest part of networking is taking the initiative to really get to know someone. Often times, our networks are full of people who have what we want or know someone who does. It’s just a matter of asking the right questions to the right people. I found a contact at Google because I happened to mention to my mom that I was interested in learning more about the company. She informed me that I already knew a family friend whose son works there and guided me to where I could find their contact information. It was then in my hands to take hold of the opportunity to reach out to them.

Getting rejected might be the scariest part about networking. I wasn’t sure that our family friend would agree to leverage her relationship with her son to get us in contact. When I messaged her I could only hope she would. And she did. The piece to always remember is that the worst thing someone will say is, “no.” and in the grand scheme of things that is really not so bad. It just means getting right back up and trying again. I have asked many people in my life to get me in touch with one of their contacts and I have only been told no once. It wasn’t scary at all. It’s a good trait to be curious about people’s lives and how they lead them. We can learn a lot from each other that way. If you aren’t sure where to start then try asking them for an informational interview because it’s pretty easy for people to talk about themselves and they anticipate that you want to learn more about them. I believe in you so get up, get out there, and start networking!

Of Possible Interest: 

Read McKenzie’s other posts

Start on the Right Foot

We are rapidly approaching the beginning of the academic year. Freshmen move in tomorrow AND classes start August 28th! We’ve put together a mini to-do list for career-related items that ought to be completed by the end of the September (or earlier). Here’s a full breakdown of career-related items you can be working on during each year of your college career.

Start the school year off right

Freshmen:

  • Come find us! We’re located in Solon Campus Center 22 (aka: The Wedge). You can also find us online at any, and all, of these locations: websiteFacebookTwitter, InstagramLinkedIn, and Pinterest. I’d list our blog, too, but if you’re reading this, you’ve already found our blog. Kudos to you!
  • Get involved on-campus – in something. This could be a student organization, your residence hall, working on-campus, and much more.
  • Start your resume…even if it just has your HS involvement, the fact that you’re now a UMD student, and any jobs you may have had up until now.

Sophomores:

  • Research careers related to your major. Check out the Follow-up of Majors, from our Graduate Follow-up Report, to see where recent UMD grads have landed jobs right out of college (with YOUR major!).
  • If you haven’t decided or declared your major yet, you can take one of our career assessments (Strong Interest Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and StrengthsQuest).
  • Get involved in something on-campus. Build your resume so you’re ready for whatever opportunities may come your way in future years. If you’re already involved in something, see how you can increase your involvement. This could be a leadership role, more responsibility, etc.

Juniors:

  • Update and polish your resume.
  • Prep for upcoming job & internship fairs (E-Fest for Engineering, Computer Science, & Science is Sept 13, Head of the Lakes Job & Internship Fair is Oct 5, and the Government & Non-Profit Career Fair is Oct 20).
  • Consider possible internship sites.

Seniors:

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

Job Search Tips – Part 1

By: Ellen (Career Counselor & guest blogger)

This summer we sent out job search tips during June and July on our Twitter account. I should explain this briefly. We frequently send out job search related content on our Twitter account. This was a concentrated effort (with a hashtag & everything) to share a #JobSearchTip every day that we were sending out content on Twitter.

Now that summer is winding down, I thought it would be helpful to have all those tips in one (or two) places. Today, I’m sharing all of the job search tips that we tweeted out during June. Even if it’s not June, these tips can be helpful for whenever you’re conducting a job search.

Job Search Tips

  • Set up job search alerts on the different job search sites you’re using.
  • Don’t job search from your couch. Go somewhere. Treat searching for a job, like a job.
  • Use GoldPASS as part of your search strategy – all you need is your UMD login info.
  • Do different job search related tasks throughout the day. Don’t spend all your time just surfing 1 job search site.
  • Research different career paths that go with your degree. This could introduce pathways you haven’t considered yet.
  • When applying for out-of-state jobs, make a point to include on your resume and/or cover letter your reasoning or plans to relocate.
  • Use social media to your advantage in your job search.
  • Attend local networking events and/or join young professionals groups. Meet the people instead of always being a number in the online system.
  • When you have an interview ALWAYS bring a printed copy of your resume for your interviewer.
  • Follow companies you’re interested in, on social media. See how they interact with customers.
  • Use the skills listed in the “qualifications” section of a job posting to help you figure out what to highlight on your resume.
  • Applying for jobs and getting no response? Your application materials potentially could use some work.
  • Google job search tips & tricks to guarantee better results. Via: YouTern
  • Have a disability you’re not quite sure if, how, or when you want to disclose it in the search process? Tips: on our blog.
  • Check out our Ace the Job Search Pinterest board for numerous articles/resources to help w/your search.

Ace the Job Search Pinterest board screenshot

Stay tuned for tips we sent out in July.