Job Search Tips – Part 1

By: Ellen (Career Counselor & guest blogger)

This summer we sent out job search tips during June and July on our Twitter account. I should explain this briefly. We frequently send out job search related content on our Twitter account. This was a concentrated effort (with a hashtag & everything) to share a #JobSearchTip every day that we were sending out content on Twitter.

Now that summer is winding down, I thought it would be helpful to have all those tips in one (or two) places. Today, I’m sharing all of the job search tips that we tweeted out during June. Even if it’s not June, these tips can be helpful for whenever you’re conducting a job search.

Job Search Tips

  • Set up job search alerts on the different job search sites you’re using.
  • Don’t job search from your couch. Go somewhere. Treat searching for a job, like a job.
  • Use GoldPASS as part of your search strategy – all you need is your UMD login info.
  • Do different job search related tasks throughout the day. Don’t spend all your time just surfing 1 job search site.
  • Research different career paths that go with your degree. This could introduce pathways you haven’t considered yet.
  • When applying for out-of-state jobs, make a point to include on your resume and/or cover letter your reasoning or plans to relocate.
  • Use social media to your advantage in your job search.
  • Attend local networking events and/or join young professionals groups. Meet the people instead of always being a number in the online system.
  • When you have an interview ALWAYS bring a printed copy of your resume for your interviewer.
  • Follow companies you’re interested in, on social media. See how they interact with customers.
  • Use the skills listed in the “qualifications” section of a job posting to help you figure out what to highlight on your resume.
  • Applying for jobs and getting no response? Your application materials potentially could use some work.
  • Google job search tips & tricks to guarantee better results. Via: YouTern
  • Have a disability you’re not quite sure if, how, or when you want to disclose it in the search process? Tips: on our blog.
  • Check out our Ace the Job Search Pinterest board for numerous articles/resources to help w/your search.

Ace the Job Search Pinterest board screenshot

Stay tuned for tips we sent out in July.

You Got a Job Offer! Now What?

By: Logan

We all know how long and grueling the job searching process is. You spend hours rewriting resumes and cover letters, reviewing multiple job posting websites nonstop, sending credentials out to potential employers, and attending interview after interview. But if you do it correctly, you will receive an offer. Congratulations! You better hurry and accept it right away before the offer is revoked, right? Wrong. There are still a few things to keep in mind even after you have been given an offer, and I will discuss these in this post.

After you receive a job offer you are allowed to have a little sigh of relief. It feels good to receive the offer, but there are still some things to consider. You may have gotten the job, but is it the right job for you? Be sure to remember you don’t have to accept the first offer you are given! Also, keep in mind you have been offered the job, but there are still some tests you must complete. These include things like reference checks, background checks, and drug tests. This is where it is crucial that you have reached out to your references and informed them they may receive a call from your potential employer. It will reflect on you poorly if your new employer calls one of your listed references and the person you wrote down is not expecting it at all. If the person is warned in advance they have the chance to think of things to say about you. It is also a common courtesy to inform them so they aren’t blindsided by the call. It would probably be a good idea to do this even before you are offered a job.

You got a job offer! Now what?

So you got the job offer, but is this the right fit? There are quite a few things to consider when deciding on a position. In my experience, I was offered four positions so I was forced to evaluate each job in every single detail. One thing to think about would be location. Do you prefer a large city or a smaller town? Do you want to live close to home or do you want to have some distance? Would you be willing to relocate across the country? These are all things I’m sure were considered while applying for the position, but it is a very important part of your final decision. Right fit can also mean company culture, training provided, and opportunity for advancement.

There are also many things to consider as far as compensation. When I was offered my positions I had an understanding of the salary and how the pay worked, but I knew little to nothing about insurance and benefits. So I decided to have my mom review all of the jobs’ benefits packages and insurance. She then broke it down for me and explained which job had the best overall compensation. This is where it is important to reach out to someone you trust if you don’t know a lot about the subject. If I didn’t ask around I could have made a poor decision based on compensation. If you don’t have a close adult or friend who knows a lot about these policies you can reach out to the UMD’s Career and Internship Services office, or your local career office. The counselors would be happy to review the information for you and provide you with thoughtful, unbiased information.

There are many things to keep in mind while deciding on a position and it is important to put them all into consideration. Be sure to reach out to trusted friends and family for assistance when needed, but overall it is your own decision to make. Review all of your options and go with the position you think you would be the happiest and most successful in.

Of Possible Interest

Read Logan’s other posts

Photo source: Unsplash | Breather

Landing a Job or Internship

By: Logan

At some point in your college career you will be searching for either an internship or job. This process is far from easy and is a lengthy, exhausting process. Whether you are graduating soon or looking to gain some experience in your field, the job search is fast-paced, competitive, and very exciting. In this blog post I will be explaining the steps I took to decide which job I wanted to accept upon graduation, and I hope this post can help someone out who is in a similar position.

I have been lucky enough to receive multiple job offers during my job search, but these did not just fall into my lap. I was proactively searching and applying for jobs far more than any of my friends, and I believe this gave me an advantage. I started early (early February for a May graduation) before many people had even begun their search. This is one point I touched on with my last blog post, try to apply early before your dream position is filled! There were many other steps I took to get my name out there. I went to the job fair, I applied to positions on multiple databases, and reached out to relatives and friends who may have known of available positions. This is how I found the companies I was interested in and got my name out to employers.

One thing I learned recently was how beneficial Spring Break can be in the job search. Yes, I understand most people would rather be laying on a beach or going on a road trip, but if you are like me and are not able to indulge in these experiences you should make the most out of your time on break. After networking with employers online and through the job fair, I scheduled in-person interviews during Spring Break when I knew I had no class and would be closer to these companies. Over my Spring Break I attended 4 in-person interviews, one phone interview, and one Skype interview. Seems like a bit of overkill, I know. Not everyone needs this many, but I was proactive, curious, and wanted to see what was out there. Also, I had nothing better to do. Setting up these interviews early is crucial in the job search because you show your initiative and drive by reaching out to companies long before graduation.

This is where the fun began. I ended up receiving four offers for jobs, and I had mixed emotions about this. Yes, it felt good to know my skills were wanted in the workplace, but how would I ever decide which one to take? This is where reaching out to all the resources you have available will benefit you. I made my decision by looking at each job from every angle. I thought about the environment of the workplace, do I feel like I would fit in? What is the typical age of others in my position? Next, I put compensation and benefits into consideration. I could understand the salary and commission pieces, but I didn’t know a lot about benefits and insurance, so I reached out to my mom and had her read it over and tell me what she thought. Since many of us students have never had a full-time job, we may know little about how good the benefits are, so it is a good idea to reach out to someone who has been through it before. I also put geographic location into consideration. Where can I see myself living? What is the cost of living in each of these areas? Do I have any family or friends in this area? And of course, you have to consider the type of work. Where do I have experience? What kind of work do I enjoy? Can I see myself moving up in this company? There are definitely many things to consider, and this made my choice very difficult.

I think the question that made me think the most and ultimately helped me come to my decision was, “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?” This made me think about how long I could see myself staying with a company, and if I could see myself doing this for a while, and it was something I hadn’t thought about very much. To come to my decision, I reached out to my parents, brother, friends, and spoke with a counselor at UMD Career and Internship Services, and altogether I got a variety of viewpoints and opinions. All of these viewpoints, combined with me thinking through each of the questions I stated above, helped me come to my decision. Ultimately, you are the only one who knows what you like, so you have to make the decision. It is also important to keep in mind most people do not find their dream job straight out of college. If you realize this is not the job for you, you can always begin the job search again.

Read Logan’s other posts

The Job Searching Process

By: Logan

Being that I will graduate from UMD in May, I have shifted my focus from strictly schoolwork and internships to finding an actual job upon graduation. This is an exciting and scary time for many graduates. Many people have never had a “real” job before, so once they get to this point they are unsure of the best practices. In this post, I will discuss my own journey and the steps I am taking to lock down a job before May.

job-search-process

Sometimes it is difficult to gauge when you should begin applying for jobs. January may seem too soon since you will not be able to work for several months, and if you wait until April you may have difficulties finding a job since many will already be filled. From what I have learned from my Career Counselors and my own experience, I have found mid-late February to be a great time to begin the search. It is early enough that many positions should still be open, and you are getting your name out early so you can begin making connections and exploring opportunities. One superb resource I took advantage of this year was attending the U of M Job & Internship Fair in Minneapolis. This job fair exceeded my expectations and introduced me to many great opportunities I was not aware of before. A job fair is a great place to make connections with companies, network with recruiters, and explore multiple career options all in one day. By conducting a bit of research before attending you will be prepared to succeed. We have multiple posts about job fairs here on the blog. There are posts about how to prepare, what to do when you’re at the fair, and what to do afterward.

logan-at-umjf
Logan at the UMN Job & Internship Fair

One important piece to remember is to not be afraid to really put yourself out there. Personally, I have applied for a large variety of jobs, even some jobs I did not expect to be interested in. It is important to put yourself out there and explore all of your options because you never know what might catch your interest. If your job search is too narrow you may find yourself having trouble finding opportunities. I’m not saying you should apply for jobs you are not interested in, but be sure to explore many opportunities. Your first job out of college is rarely your dream job, and sometimes you just need a few years of experience to add to your resume before you can land your dream job.

Right now, it seems the most common form of job searching is through internet databases. These can include sites like Indeed.com, Monster, GoldPASS, and many more. Last Spring, I wrote a blog post about different job searching sites and their pros and cons. What I have learned from applying to multiple jobs online is it is helpful to include as much information as you can. On sites like Indeed, you can supply minimal information, no cover letter, and a very simple resume. Although this is the fastest and easiest option, I have found applying to jobs using the bare minimum very rarely results in calls back. If you are going to use these services, make sure your resume is updated and current. Personally, when I apply for a job I am very interested in I attach my resume, cover letter (even if they do not ask for one), references, and sometimes a letter of recommendation if there is a space to add one. Adding these extra credentials will show you are really interested in this job and you put in extra time to apply for the position.

I have more tips on how to navigate your job search which I will continue in my next blog post. These tips can also be used by students looking for summer jobs or internships, this information is all relevant! Be sure to be professional and thorough, and apply early enough so the position you want isn’t filled. Good luck with your search!

Read Logan’s other posts

Photo source: Unsplash | Mari Helin-Tuominen

Saving Your Job Searches: GoldPASS Edition

Editor’s note: While this post talks about saving “job” searches, the same tips apply to internship searches.

By: David

Say you find a list of awesome job postings on GoldPASS, but your 2 o’clock obligation is in five minutes. Yet, you have no idea what you entered to compile such an awesome list. Lucky for you, there is a magic button in GoldPASS that allows you to save your searches. Today’s post will be centered on the importance of saved searches. I cannot recall how many times saved searches have…well…saved me from scuffling and shuffling through a website to find the job postings that I was dying to apply for. Many job posting websites have various ways to go about the saved search process, but today I’ll show you the simple way to go about it through GoldPASS. Let’s begin!

GoldPASS
Before jumping in, it’s important to know that GoldPASS can get quite hefty in terms of the amount of job openings that are posted on a regular basis. With this in mind, it’s important to save your searches in GoldPASS before your desired posts get lost in the vast sea of job openings, which is not a pleasant scenario when applying for jobs. Assuming that you already know how to apply and look for positions on GoldPASS, I’ll briefly go over it again in Step 1 and then jump straight into the saving your search process. Fortunately, if you don’t have experience with finding positions on GoldPASS, you can read all about it in a previous blog post, How to Apply for a Position in GoldPASS.

Step 1: Entering KeyWords
So the first step you always want to do is to fill out your desired sections for a job search. To narrow down your search, add specific information and leverage the advanced search option (which I already have opened at the bottom of the image) to better filter your options. A good tip for GoldPASS job searches is to NOT fill out every single section as too many filters can lead you to zero postings.

goldpass-1

Step 2: The Magic Button: “Save Search”
Next up is the holy, magic button: save search. By looking at the image, you can see on the right-hand side where the red arrow is pointing to save your search.

goldpass-2

Step 3: Entering a name for the search
Upon clicking the button, a small window like this will pop up which will direct you to place a name to represent the search. In this case, I’ve decided to name it “Full-Time Entry Level” as I am looking for full-time entry level positions after graduation.

goldpass-3

Step 4: I want to…
Now that you have your search saved, you can always come back to it. In order to do so, go to the “I want to…” button on the left-hand side of GoldPASS as indicated in the screenshot below.

goldpass-4

Upon clicking on the button, it will expand and look something like this (see below). To clarify, you will have to click the “Saved Searches” button to further expand the list of searches that you have saved. From there, you will see the names appear in which you have given a name to each specific search option such as “Full-Time Entry Level” as I have in the previous step.

goldpass-4a

Step 5: Voila!
And there you have it! A five-step process to saving your searches on GoldPASS. Every time you click your saved search options (Full-Time Entry Level, etc.) you will be redirected to the keywords that were saved under that specific category.

goldpass-5

Conclusion
Before leaving, now that you know how to save your searches on GoldPASS, I would highly recommend for you to take this concept of saved searches with you wherever online you decide to apply for jobs. Searching for jobs can get messy at times and it’s never fun having to constantly start from square one. So always, always, ALWAYS save your job searches or at least keep track of them when searching. Till then, keep saving those searches and as always, stay gold.

Read David’s other posts

Know How to Use the Tools in the Toolbox

By: Tori

We’ve all been told the tips and tricks for interviews from peers, teachers, and family members. You understand the importance of knowing your strengths and weaknesses, reading over those dreaded situational-based questions, practicing your smile and wave, and making sure you brush your teeth and shower beforehand.

If you’re like me, you still get confused on how to use these tips to help you prepare for an interview. It’s as if you have all the tools in the toolbox, but no idea what any of them are for.

The last time I prepared for an interview it was like studying for a test. Not just your nice, easy 10 point vocabulary quiz. No, it was like those 40% of your grade midterm exams. Do I regret the effort and time I put into this? Absolutely not. It was completely worth it. I firmly believe it is how I landed my internship at Hormel Foods– I got an A on the exam.

I decided to use the tips, or tools, I had heard numerous times before and actually take the initiative to practice them. I think more often than not this is where many people fail when it comes to interviews. You have to practice for them. It’s like writing a speech for class. You don’t practice it once before you speak in front of 30 people; you practice it a bajillion times, still hoping you won’t embarrass yourself when you go up and do the real thing.

One of the most successful ways I prepare for interviews is by making an Experience-Task-Growth Chart. I make three columns and write the role, what I did, and how I grew down on a piece of paper. This allows me to visualize my skills and abilities without having to think too hard. It also makes practicing those dreaded situational-based questions much easier because I can literally see my role, what I did, and how I grew or accomplished a goal, right on the piece of paper in front of me.

Here is an example of my Experience-Task-Growth Chart:

Experience: My role Task: What did I did Growth: How I grew
Sassy Strawberry Cashier Counted Tills

 

Assisted Customers

Cleaned the Shop

Managed stock

Held accountable for money and store upkeep

Was a positive influence on the business with my enthusiastic personality and attention to the customers

Problem solved based on customer situation, for example coupons failing
Did what I felt was best; was able to make quick decisions
Followed procedures and safety regulations

Austin Country Club Lifeguard Regulated pool

and safety of patrons

Developed relationships with members

 

Undivided attention and full alertness to patrons and members

Confidence in my ability and certification in CPR and First Aid

Remained personable toward members

 

Class Title Teaching Assistant Held one-on-one meetings

Met with professor weekly

Spoke in front of the class weekly

Graded assignments

Adapted to different personalities in order to fulfill criteria

Developed relationships with students and helped them transition into a new environment- I did this by relating to their experiences

Responsible for fair and valued work

Sacrificed my own time to be there for students in a difficult transition

Cru Summer Mission Participant Spent 4 weeks with college students all over the US in Crested Butte, CO.

Experiential learning; hiking, biking, backpacking, whitewater rafting

Grew in relationships with others, community, and leadership

Understood diversity; lived with 10 other girls who were previously strangers

Learned how to be vulnerable in new situations

Cru Leadership Team Member Attended weekly meetings to plan and prepare our large group meeting for 70+ students

Met one-on-one with freshman members

Marketed the organization and conferences

Utilized time management and collaboration skills

Creative; learn to think outside of the box

Problem solving- students were not as involved and their was a change in our organization. I had to use my creative and critical thinking to develop ways for students to be more engaged and apply a different approach

 

Another thing that helps me while I am being interviewed is bringing a copy of my resume. Usually I just set it to the side, but if I need to answer a question and can’t think of a great example I reference my resume. While many people may think this is distracting, it actually shows you are prepared and provides you with more opportunities to relate your experiences in unique ways.

Now that you know how to use a few of those tips, or tools in your toolbox, you’ll be better prepared for your next interview.

Good luck, and remember to be authentic!

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Tori’s other posts

Control Your Interview

By: Kirsi

Nauseation of when your home team squanders a playoff game is equivalent to the sick to your stomach feeling of bombing an interview. As a freshman electrical engineer, I failed a technical interview for a computer aided design company. They challenged me to write a recursive programming method, describe how the inside of a motor works, and explain the forces and stress points on a stop light pole in ten minutes. Unsalvageable as your interview may seem, there is hope to take control of your interview! An interview gone wrong can be saved by expanding on questions you are asked, transforming negative responses into positive ones, and amending a closing statement.

control-interview

Expand on Questions
Although human resources has the almighty power to hire and fire, they can not read your mind. When you answer interview questions keep in mind that your interviewers did not share your experience with you. Illustrate your experience with goals, problem solving, results and quantities. Instead of saying “I practiced leadership when I was a manager at Taco Bell” say; “My leadership skills were put to use when I was a manager at Taco Bell leading a team of 10 individuals per shift. I vetted five perspective workers per month, learned each position, and ensured each employee completed their training.” Do not be afraid to expand on your experience. You are not bragging! You are clarifying and explaining your experiences. Sometimes interviewers are specifically instructed NOT to ask the interviewee to elaborate. The interviewer wants to see how you communicate your qualifications.

Thinking on Your Feet
Interviewers will purposefully throw curve-ball questions that catch you off guard. Not just to watch you squirm –  to see how handle the unexpected. When asked “What is your greatest weakness?” Do not leave your answer at “I have problems waking up in the morning.” Explain your improvements and focus on the positives. “I am working on getting to my 8:00am class by setting earlier alarms, keeping a regular sleeping schedule and cooking a great breakfast. I have been improving and getting to school early to get a good seat.” Typical curve-ball questions include…

  • What is your greatest weakness?
  • What is the hardest decision you have ever made?
  • What was your greatest failure?
  • Why should I hire you?

unsplash_tim_gouw

Powerful Closing Statement
At the end of your interview, especially if you feel the interview did not go well, end with a closing statement summarizing qualifications. Typically an interview will conclude with “Do you have any questions?” You can then appropriately add, “I don’t have any questions at this moment. However, I would like to end with why I am the most qualified candidate for this position…(key narratives that make you most qualified).” I have actually used this strategy in interviews gone wrong and have gotten job offers as a result. Again, interviewers may be specifically instructed NOT to ask more questions than the handful supplied so each candidate gets the same chance. Interviewers may not ask questions that naturally invoke the best answer from you. You can still take control of the interview by amending a powerful closing statement that best shares your strengths.

Other Preparation Tools
Some interviews will focus solely on “soft skills” –  how you interact with coworkers. Interview Stream is a good resource for interviewing practice. You can listen to your answers, count your “umms,” and check for idiosyncrasies. Depending on how technical your major is you may be asked to perform a technical interview as I described in the introduction. Ask recruiters, professors, acquaintances who work for that organization, tech club members, LinkedIn/ online communities, and friends about what you could expect from that organization’s technical interview. There are plethora of free technical interview practice sites.

Of Possible Interest: 

Read Kirsi’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash