Beginner's Guide to Using GoldPASS Powered by Handshake, Part 2

By: Kendra

In my last blog post, I wrote all about GoldPASS, what it is, and how to get started using it. In this post, I am going to focus on how to search for opportunities using the platform. GoldPASS houses thousands and thousands of job, internship, and volunteer opportunity postings. These postings are specifically seeking students and recent graduates, which makes GoldPASS a perfect platform for us current Bulldogs and those who have graduated within the past five years.

Image: looking down on keyboard, notebook, and full coffee cup
Text: Beginner's Guide to GoldPASS powered by Handshake

To find postings that are specific to what you are seeking, follow these steps: 

Make sure your profile is completed as much as possible. 
By having your profile complete, the system is able to show you opportunities strictly based on the information you entered such as major, interests, skills, and preferred industries. Completing your profile as much as possible will better ensure that you are seeing opportunities that are of some interest to you, even if they are not exactly what you are looking for.

Set filters specific to what you are looking for. 
By clicking on “Jobs” in the top navigation menu, you will be brought to a screen that looks like this (Below). This is where you can apply filters to your search. I always like to start by physically clicking on different filters, rather than typing a title in because it is hard to know what a company might name their opportunity. 

Job search filter menu on GoldPASS

It is then a good idea to filter based on which preference is most important to you. For example, I have recently been perusing GoldPASS in search of an internship or job for this coming summer. Since I have housing and have to pay for it over the summer anyway, I would like to stay in Duluth, so I always search by location first. As you can see in the image, you are able to filter by location, time commitment, or industry with just a single click. Then, by clicking on ‘Filters”, you are able to refine your search even more. 

Save your searches.
When you are finished choosing filters and feel you have a group of opportunities that are interesting to you, it is important to save your search. This can be done by clicking the blue, “Save your search” link on the top left of the opportunity search page, as shown below. By doing this, you will get an email whenever an opportunity that matches your search criteria is posted. This can be edited at any time in your notification settings.   

Job posting screenshot from GoldPASS

Save jobs you are interested in.
Anytime you come across a job that interests you, saving it is a good idea. This can be done by clicking on the star that is located to the right of each opportunity title (you can see this in the picture above). When you have opportunities saved, you are able to click “My Favorite Jobs” on the top of the job search page and this will bring you to a list of all of the jobs you have favorited. This is helpful because it keeps all of your potential positions in one place. 

Apply for positions. 
When you are ready to start applying for positions, the application process depends entirely on the company and the opportunity. Some require that you apply through GoldPASS and also apply through the company’s actual site. This is easy, though, as all you need to apply on GoldPASS is a resume and then it directs you to the external application. Other opportunities only require that a resume be submitted through GoldPASS, which is super easy. If you come across a position that you want to apply for, click “Apply Now” and follow the posting-specific instructions to submit your application. 

Searching and applying for jobs and internships can be an overwhelming task. With these steps and tips, I hope you find yourself feeling confident in your ability to find opportunities that interest you on GoldPASS. As always, do not hesitate to stop by Solon Campus Center 22 with any questions that you might have. In my next and final post on GoldPASS, I will be explaining all of the other things that we can do on GoldPASS, so stay tuned for that. 

Best, Kendra

Of Possible Interest
GoldPASS powered by Handshake
Internships; Job Search – all our blog posts on the topic
Ace the Job Search; Internships – our Pinterest boards filled with articles & resources

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Lukas Blazek

Beginner’s Guide to Using GoldPASS Powered by Handshake, Part 1

By: Kendra

What is GoldPASS powered by Handshake?
GoldPASS, Handshake, or GoldPASS powered by Handshake are some of the different names you might have heard before. Regardless of the name you might have heard, the system is the same. GoldPASS is an online platform that connects students and alumni from any of the five University of Minnesota campuses with jobs, internships, and employers. One can find full- or part-time positions, summer jobs, internships, or volunteer opportunities by using GoldPASS. The reason behind the different names is because many different universities and colleges across the United States use the system, which is Handshake, for employers to post opportunities. GoldPASS is just the name that the University of Minnesota chose to distinguish our Handshake platform from others. 

Why use GoldPASS?
Based on my previous explanation, you might be thinking that GoldPASS sounds very similar to LinkedIn … so why use it? The best part about GoldPASS is that employers who post their opportunities in the system are specifically seeking University of Minnesota graduates, as GoldPASS is only for University of Minnesota graduates and alumni. If this weren’t true, they would not bother with GoldPASS and they would just post on LinkedIn or similar sites. This is not to say that you shouldn’t use LinkedIn, because that is a great resource, too. GoldPASS, however, is just for us, which I think is pretty cool. Also, GoldPASS is a smaller platform than LinkedIn or other job posting sites, which means less people will be vying for the same opportunities. 

image: desktop with notebook, computer keyboard, and coffee cup
text: beginner's guide to GoldPASS powered by Handshake

What can GoldPASS do for me? 
Upon completing your profile on GoldPASS, the possibilities are endless. One can see job postings that are curated just for them, events that might be coming up on any of the five campuses, and more. One of my favorite aspects about GoldPASS is users have the option to have their profile private or public. A personal example: When I was in the process of completing my profile, I had it private so employers and other students would not be able to see it until I was finished. This was nice because it allowed me to perfect everything before others were able to see any of it. Then, when I was ready, I made my profile public. This allowed different companies to seek students based on their available jobs and reach out to them. In fact, I have had companies reaching out to me about their positions because my education and skills aligned with what they were looking for. So, while GoldPASS is for students to connect with and find employers that interest them, it is also useful for employers to find future employees.

Where should I start? 
The first thing one should do when starting to use GoldPASS is login and start completing their profile. To login, click on this link: https://app.joinhandshake.com/login. Upon logging in for the first time, users will be prompted to complete their profile as shown below:

Sign in screen for GoldPASS

To have a complete profile, one will need to enter their education information (ie. which campus they are attending, their majors/minors, and expected graduation date), their interests, work and volunteer experience, skills, and more. I think of my profile as a super in-depth resume, because it holds the same purpose as a resume does: to give a viewer a snapshot of what I have done to make myself applicable for the opportunities I am interested in. This process can take some time, especially when done thoroughly and with detail. The great part about this is that users have the option to make their profiles private, which I recommend doing until your profile is complete, or as complete as possible. Here is a snapshot of my GoldPASS profile:

Kendra profile on GoldPASS

As you can see, my profile is only 85% complete, which is entirely okay. I do not have certain areas of my profile added simply because I do not have information to add to them, which, again, is okay. Fill your profile with the information you do have. As you move along in life, you will gain more and more experiences, skills, and information you can add to your profile. Another item that can be added to your profile is your resume. When a resume is uploaded, it must be approved before you can begin applying for opportunities. We want resumes to be approved just so we can make sure they are great before employers get to see them. If you are in need of a resume review, stop by Solon Campus Center 22 and a peer educator would love to help you out. After uploading a resume, you are all set to start searching for and applying for opportunities, which I will dive into in my next post. 

Stay tuned for a second part to this GoldPASS powered by Handshake Guide, where I will go into more detail about how to use the system. If you need any assistance with your GoldPASS account, please don’t hesitate to stop by our office at Solon Campus Center 22 and we would be happy to help. 

Best, Kendra

Of Possible Interest:
GoldPASS powered by Handshake
Internships; Job Search – all our blog posts on the topics
Ace the Job Search – our Pinterest board filled with articles & resources

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Lukas Blazek

Tips for Time Management

By: Kendra

In starting my second year here at UMD, I have found myself having to make some changes from how I lived out my first two semesters here. Specifically, I have had to put more thought and effort into managing my time. During my first year at UMD, I took only 15 credits per semester and I took them all in-person. Also, I worked only about 10 hours per week. I was involved in intramurals, psychology club, and dedicated to working out, which has all remained. This year, though, I am taking 18 credits, 12 of which are online, and working 20-25 hours per week. Because of this increase in coursework and time spent working, I needed to add and change some of my previous habits in order to better manage my time. I’m sharing my tips with you for how I make sure I get everything done when it is supposed to be done: 

Prioritize Sleep
If you’re anything like me, getting enough sleep is CRUCIAL. I cannot function productively on less than eight hours of sleep each night and I strive to get nine. Of course, I want to stay up late watching movies, spending time with my friends, or catching up on my favorite Netflix series, but I know that if I don’t get enough sleep, my productivity the next day will plummet. So how do I do it? I give myself a bedtime. If I know I need to be awake tomorrow morning at 8 AM, I make sure I am in bed with my phone and computer powered off by 11 PM the night before. I am the type of person who needs a while to unwind before falling asleep, so I try to be in bed even earlier so I can watch a show or read for awhile and still get my 9 hours of sleep. This helps me wake up and feel energized to tackle my day.

Text: Tips for Time Management
Image: hour glass with blue sand on a rock beach

Use a Planner
By now, I am sure everyone has heard someone tell them they should really use a planner. I know it sounds cheesy, but believe me, it is so necessary. At the beginning of this semester, I spent hours looking through my class syllabi and writing due dates in my planner. I write every single assignment, project, quiz, and exam due date in my planner, which really helps me plan out my weeks. Then, on Sunday nights, I look at the assignments I have due during the upcoming week and make to-do lists for each day of the week. I like to make a list for each day of the week because it helps me balance the amount of schoolwork I do each day. I find that when I don’t do this, I procrastinate and push tasks to the next day and then I grow frustrated and stressed because I have more to do. I use Post-It notes for my to-dos and then I just stick them in my planner. When I finish an assignment, I cross it off on my to-do list as well as in my actual planner. Let me tell you — this is the best feeling ever. 

Use Google Calendar
Another resource I use when it comes to planning is Google Calendar. I have found that this is pretty hit or miss — some students use it and rely on it completely and others have never even opened it. Because Google is what our campus uses to communicate, I highly suggest using Google Calendar. If you need to meet with a professor, all you need to do is type in their name and you can see when they are busy. This can be done with students, advisors, and anyone on campus, too. For me, Google Calendar helps me plan my days. I have two calendars I use — one visible for everyone and one only I can see. I use my visible calendar for things I don’t mind people seeing such as my work schedule, class schedules, and when I have meetings and such. My other calendar, though, is what I use for my personal life. I schedule when I am going to the gym, time with friends, and really anything I am doing outside of school. What is amazing about Google Calendar is that I can have my work/class schedule visible to everyone and my personal schedule private, but one of my professors will still see everything I have going on if he or she were to look at my calendar. This is because Google just writes ‘Busy’ on time slots that are scheduled privately. Each week, when I am making my to-do lists, I check my calendar to see what I have going on each day, which helps me make realistic to-do lists for each day. 

Stay on Campus
This is definitely something that is much different than last year, as I was always on campus. Now that I live off campus, I have learned that in order to be as productive as possible, I need to stay on campus as much as I can. When I go home, I find myself getting cozy and then not wanting to come back to campus or getting anything done at home. This also requires planning, though. If you have breaks in your days, try your best to stay on campus so you can get some work done. Packing a lunch is also a great way to make sure you are not tempted to go back home throughout your day. Want to get a workout in? Either pack the things you need for the gym and go when your day is done or consider getting a locker in the locker room so you can leave your gym essentials on campus. By staying on campus as much as possible, I find myself accomplishing more and being more productive. It also makes going home at the end of the day super awesome because I typically am done for the day when I get home. 

Take Breaks
This is my final tip for being productive and managing your time. Taking breaks while you are studying or working on assignments is extremely important. Whether it be watching a short Youtube video, getting up and walking around, or just spending a few minutes on your phone, taking breaks will help you be even more efficient because it will keep you from burning out. I like to work for 45 minutes and then take 10-15 minutes to let my brain relax. Sometimes, though, I will take a little break after I finish an assignment to regroup before moving on to the next task. For me, this pushes me to work hard on homework because I know I can rest once I finish or once the time is up. It also helps keep me awake because I don’t allow myself to just sit and work for hours and hours on end. 

The life of a college student is busy — there’s no getting around that. That’s why it is so important to manage your time and make sure you are using it wisely. I had to alter my time management skills from last year to better accommodate to my life this semester. Ultimately, it is up to you to find time management strategies that work for you, but hopefully some of my tips are helpful. 

Best, Kendra 

Of Possible Interest:
Productivity & Wellness – all our blog posts on the topic
Healthy on the Job – our Pinterest board filled with resources & articles

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Aron Visuals

The Desk Essentials

By: Kendra

So you just got your first job after graduation and your first day is tomorrow … First off, congratulations! Second, what are you going to bring with you? I am sure you will bring your keys, wallet, and a cup of coffee/tea (of course), but what else might you need? With all of the nerves and excitement that comes with getting a job after graduation, no one worries about what to bring with them to make their life at work easier.

Image: white notepads and gold binder clips on white desk
Text: The desk essentials

I asked a few professional staff what sorts of random items they have in their desks that come in handy and here is what I found:

  • Deodorant — No one likes to be smelly at work!
  • Lint roller — You never know what sorts of dust and fuzzies will stick to you throughout the day.
  • Stain remover — A stain on your top or pants would be embarrassing!
  • Fidget items — For the long days when you just can’t quite sit still.
  • Hand weights — Do some exercising during your breaks!
  • Shoes — If it is rains or snows, you have nothing to worry about because you have dry, warm shoes waiting for you in your office.
  • Nail clipper and nail file — Sometimes you just need to clip your nails or remove a pesky hangnail.
  • Earring backs — You never know when the back of your earring will fall off!
  • Bandages — Blisters, paper cuts, hangnails, etc.
  • Toothbrush/toothpaste — You’re safe if you forget to brush in the morning and if you have some garlicky pasta for lunch.
  • Small mirror — Perfect for touching up make-up, hair, or just making sure you have nothing in your teeth!
  • Pain medication — Don’t let a headache ruin your day.
  • Thank you cards — It is always nice to send thank you cards after meetings with important people in your workplace, having these available will make it super easy to do!
  • Coffee mugs — You might like to offer coffee or tea to people you meet with.
  • Sewing kit — You never know when a seam will come loose.
  • Shoe polish — Clean the scuffs and dust off of your shoes to keep yourself looking put together!
  • Screen cleaner — It is amazing how dirty a computer screen can get. Keep it clean and clear with some screen cleaner.
  • Glasses cleaner — No one likes a smudgy pair of spectacles!

Getting a new job after graduation is exciting! Even if you don’t have a job where you are seated at a desk, having some of these items in your car, purse, or backpack can be really handy. This is not to say that you need every single one of these items, but it allows you to think of things that might be helpful to have with you as you go to work each day because you never know what might happen. I wish you the best of luck with your new job and hope that having some of these items was of help for you!

Of Possible Interest:
What to Bring on the First Day of Work
On the Job – all our blog posts on the topic
Now That You’re On The Job – our Pinterest board filled with articles & resources

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Stil Classics

3 Tips for Creating Your Freshman Resume

By: Kendra

As a freshman in college, building a resume that would be acceptable in the professional world can be a daunting task. Knowing what to include, what not to include, and even where to begin can be a struggle. You never know when you will have a job opportunity come up or when you might need a resume for a class assignment, so having one available is always a good option. Here are three tips for starting your resume as a freshman:

Start a document.
This might sound obvious, but it truly is the first step in building a resume. We recommend just started with a blank document in Word or Google Docs. Creating a document and putting your personal information at the top is a great start. Information that is important to include is your name, email, and phone number. The rest of the sections of your resume, which typically include an objective, education, experience, and activities, can be difficult to navigate at first. To begin, it might be helpful to brainstorm. Think of all of the activities you are currently involved in, whether it be school, clubs, sports teams, jobs, etc. Make a list of all of these things and then when you feel your list is complete, separate them into the sections of your resume. Information on how to format these sections as well as what other information to include can be found in our Career Handbook.

Image: brown background, looking down on a cup of sharpened pencils
Text: 3 tips for creating your freshman resume. Start a document. Don't forget about high school. Build and update.

Don’t Forget About High School
A common misconception is that once you get to college, all of your high school achievements are irrelevant. When you begin your college career at UMD, you will not have had many opportunities to join clubs or get work experience to put on your resume. This is why including activities you were involved in previously is acceptable. Achievements like being salutatorian, valedictorian, student body president, or involved in clubs and organizations should especially be included. Some even list their high school in the Education section, which is a great idea when you have just started college and don’t yet have a GPA from UMD. Courses you have taken in high school can be included as well, especially College in the Schools (CIS), Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO), and Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Jobs you had while you were in high school can be included as well, especially if they are relevant to your objective.

Build and Update
Once you have a resume created, you are not done. As you continue your years here at UMD, you will likely gain experiences that can be added to your resume. Updating your education after you have a GPA from UMD, for example, is one way to update your resume. Getting involved in organizations, clubs, sports, and jobs are other great ways to build your resume. Even courses you take can be included. Once you begin to explore more of these areas, add them to your resume. Remember, though, to remove information from your high school years as it becomes irrelevant (usually during sophomore year of college). If you are unsure how to get involved or need some guidance in building your resume, stop by Career & Internship Services (SCC 22) and a Peer Educator or Career Counselor can help you.

Resumes can be intimidating at first, but once you start working, it’s not so bad. If you need any help at all, check out our website, our Career Handbook, or stop by Solon Campus Center 22. We have students who will review your resume anytime and can also have professional staff review it. You do not need to have a resume completed to come in, either. At any point in the resume process, feel free to come in if you are seeking assistance.

Of Possible Interest:
Resume Examples (especially look at Samir Sophomore)
Building Your Resume – all our blog posts about the things you can do and put them on your resume
Resume & Cover Letter – all our blog posts about the nuts & bolts of these documents
Boosting Your Career in College – our Pinterest board filled with articles & resources

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | rawpixel

New Major – What do I do Now?

By: Kendra

I was one of those freshmen who came to UMD thinking I had everything figured out. I was going to come to UMD for Integrated Elementary and Special Education, complete my student teaching as required, and find a job as a special education teacher. I had a plan and I thought for sure that I would stick to that plan. Well, I was wrong. Within the first couple months of school, I knew that special education was not my calling and that I wanted to do something else. After meeting with the career counselors, taking each of the assessments provided by our office, and some soul searching, I decided to switch my major to Psychology with a minor in Early Childhood Studies. Now I have my major and minor figured out, but need to figure out what I am going to do with them. Here is how I am going to do that:

Take Classes in Various Fields
While many majors have set courses that one needs to take to earn a degree, there are plenty of majors that have many different classes that one can choose to take to fulfill graduation requirements. Your academic advisor can be helpful in that realm of knowing which classes you absolutely have to take and which areas are more flexible in the courses you choose. If you do have the option to pick and choose which ones you would like to take, do it. Take classes in areas you think you do not like, maybe it will surprise you! Taking a variety of classes also helps you figure out which areas of a certain major interest you so you can tailor your education to what you really want to learn about.

Get Involved
This is something everyone will tell you, but don’t overlook it because it really is huge when it comes to making opportunities for yourself. Being active and involved on campus can be extremely beneficial to getting internships, jobs, scholarships, and it is typically pretty fun! UMD has a club for almost anything, so getting involved in one should not be a hassle. It is also a great idea to get involved in your classes. Ask questions, contribute in class, go see your professor during office hours — only good will come from it! Forming relationships with professors is great because they might need a teaching assistant or research assistant in the future and you will lose out on that opportunity if the instructor doesn’t even know you.

Job Research
Learning about jobs is another great way to explore a new major. Researching is important to learn about what people in different careers do, what they earn, and what sorts of steps they took to get where they currently are. A great way to do this is to do a simple Google search and just see what comes up. This is a good way to find out what sorts of jobs are out there and what those jobs look like. Job postings will show what skills and education are required for the job as well as what the job duties are. Another great resource is the Graduate Follow-up Report. This allows you to see what previous UMD graduates have done with their degrees right after college in specific majors, which can be really helpful when it comes to choosing a career path. Learning more about different careers will help you find ones that you might be interested in. When you have done this, set up job shadows with people in those careers. Job shadowing gives you first hand experience as to what a career is like and will be the best determinant of whether or not you will fit within that career.

If you are like me and don’t really know what you want to do, try these three things. If you need any further help, stop by Career & Internship Services at 22 Solon Campus Center and schedule an appointment with a career counselor.

Of Possible Interest:
Building Your Resume – all your blog posts on the topic
Boost Your Career in College; Turn Your Major into a Career – our Pinterest boards filled with articles & resources

Read Kendra’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Joao Silveira

Meet Kendra

Kendra Headshot


Name: Kendra
Major: Psychology
Minor: Early Childhood Studies
Year in school: Freshman
When I started working at UMD Career & Internship Services: Fall 2018

Favorite place in Duluth: This is an extremely tough question to answer because I have not been to all of the places in Duluth that are on my bucket list. I have been to many different places, but have so many more places to go see and explore. Currently, my favorite place in Duluth is the top of Enger Tower. Anyone who has been will agree that the view is absolutely breathtaking. It is a pretty basic choice, but I figure you can’t go wrong with a view like that. My friends and I have made many trips up to the tower and I take all of my visitors there so they can experience it, too.

Favorite hobby:
When I have free time, which is rare, I enjoy doing anything with my friends or just relaxing and watching TV or YouTube. I love watching vlogs on YouTube and my absolute favorite vlogger is Abby Asselin. I have also recently started binge watching One Tree Hill again, but it consumes me so I have to be careful to only watch an episode or two at a time. I have seen the entire series twice, but it is amazing how much I forgot about the show.

Best career advice I’ve received:
I have always been one to get super worried and nervous about making decisions. Because of this, my mom has always advised me not to be too anxious about choosing a career path. She tells me that whatever I am supposed to do will come to me, so stressing about it really is not worth it. Being a freshman, this advice is great for me because I am just in the beginning stages of my career journey.

Piece of career advice you have for other students:
Talk to important people in your life about your plans for the future. Although your path is ultimately up to you, hearing another’s opinion about what strengths and qualities they see in you and how those would fit into a certain field can be extremely helpful. Your families, close friends, teachers, or even employers might see something in you that you do not see in yourself, which might open the door for a whole range of different possibilities.