Handling Physical Disabilities in College & the Workplace

By: Whitney

College students, especially those leaving home for the first time, experience a whole lot of new things—new school, new friends, new interests—and many firsts. Like many students, I felt uncertainty, anxiety, and excitement about these things. One area of uncertainty for me was how to handle my physical disability as an adult. I had additional questions about jobs such as: How physically demanding they would be? Would employers be hesitant to hire me or underestimate me? After some time, I decided I needed to acknowledge my Cerebral Palsy (CP) related uncertainties and find ways to address them. I can’t speak for everyone with a physical disability nor everyone with CP. How I want to address the impact of CP in my adult life is a process I am still figuring out and I wanted to share my journey with you all up to this point.

Overview of Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy is really an umbrella term describing a group of conditions that affect balance, movement of the body, and muscle coordination resulting from damage to the brain (specifically motor areas). It is not genetic and is said to be not progressive (United Cerebral Palsy, 2010 as cited in Whidden, 2013). However, as the body changes throughout life, I have also noticed changes in my experiences with CP. Additionally, because the brain is exceedingly complex, and people are unique, everyone with CP experiences it differently, yet some of our experiences may be similar.

I have had CP since birth, a mild form that makes my leg muscles tighter than average. I have a touchy sense of balance and needed the support of a walker to get around until partway through elementary school when I had a surgery to improve my muscle tone. In middle school, I started having muscle spasms in my legs that started to make things more difficult. These get worse with high—levels of stress, nervousness, or if I need to stand still for long periods of time.

Four Areas I’ve Worked On

Self-advocation
In my journey to learn how to handle concerns related to my disability in the workplace, one of the best tools I have is self-advocation. The best way to learn how to self-advocate is to do it. Sometimes I wouldn’t go after opportunities that appealed to me because I was uncertain about if I would be physically able to handle them. I have learned that uncertainty is part of it. For me, self-advocation means question asking. When I feel uncertainty, I pinpoint the specific reasons I feel uncertain and find out what information I can related to those issues by asking questions. After getting more information, I can then evaluate an opportunity more accurately. If it still interests me after that, then I go for it, asking for accommodations if necessary. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability has useful tips about self-advocacy.

Self-advocation, while empowering, can also be tiring. One important thing to note is that being a self-advocate doesn’t mean handling things alone. It’s helpful to have people around to help too! Which brings me to my next point.

Handling physical disabilities in the college and the workplace

Community
In most situations, I am the only person I know who has CP. Sometimes it’s easy to feel like the I’m only one dealing with these concerns. Finding a community of trustworthy people, who are dealing with similar things has been helpful for me, and can be found in many ways. On campus, getting involved with Disability Resources is one way. I have found community by joining Facebook groups specifically related to CP. People of many ages and many experiences with CP are part of these groups and I have gotten to read posts about some of their experiences in life and in the workplace and some CP related questions they have.

In relation to the workforce, community can also mean seeking out stories of individuals with any disability in the workforce and learning about what jobs they are doing and how they handled entry into and daily activities of the workforce. This summer I got to hear a little bit about an elementary school teacher who was also blind and her approach to her job. To hear of other individuals living with disabilities doing work in a human services job (a field related closely to my interests) was encouraging. It reminded me that there are multiple great ways to do a job and be effective.

Accommodation
Figuring out reasonable accommodations and having conversations about them is an area I’m still trying to figure out. Frankly, sometimes I don’t know what I’m going to need, especially before I’ve started the work. Sometimes I know that something presents a problem for me but am not sure how to solve it. Sometimes I am hesitant at asking for accommodation because I’m afraid of being underestimated. I have recently discovered JAN (the Job Accommodation Network). Which lists possible workplace accommodations for many different disabilities (physical and otherwise) as well as questions employers could ask to help pinpoint what accommodations may be helpful (I think they are questions I could ask myself as well). One of the suggestions for CP was a sit stand stool a lightweight foldable stool I could carry around with me for when I need to sit. Something I hadn’t considered using in the workplace before but could be extremely helpful for me.

Self-disclosure
For some people, the disability they live with is readily apparent to others and for some, it’s not. I’m in a grey area where people can see something different about me but don’t necessarily know straight away about the disability. Self-disclosure then becomes a question. If I want to self-disclose and when to do it. My self-disclosure choices have changed throughout the years. I have always remained very open about disability and my life but choose to self-disclose significantly less often these days than I did when I was in middle school and high school. In college, I have re-evaluated when I want to self-disclose and chose not to tell people about it unless they respectfully asked. In job situations, I have also only disclosed when I came across something I thought I would need accommodation for. I have sometimes disclosed in applications, during interviews, on the job, and for some positions, I haven’t disclosed at all.

Current Thoughts
Everyone has so many unique skills and perspectives to offer in life, including the workforce. My experiences with CP have given me many opportunities for creative problem solving, finding a new way to accomplish tasks, and practice adaptability. Disability is one aspect of my life and making decisions about how I want to approach this part of my life has given me more confidence. These decisions are not set in stone and can always be revisited as my needs and ideas change.

For all my uncertainties about having these conversations within the workplace or during college, all the people I have ever talked to have been respectful and willing to help me.

Of Possible Interest:

Read Whitney’s other posts

Photo Source: Unsplash | Felix Plakolb

Self-Advocacy in the Workplace

By: Alissa (Disability Specialist & Guest Author)

Editor’s Note: Today’s post continues the year-long collaboration we are doing with the Disability Resources office on the UMD Campus.

One of the most important skills to learn if you are an individual with a learning difference or disability, whether that be physical or invisible, is how to be an advocate for yourself and be able to communicate effectively about your needs in whatever may be thesetting.

Self-advocacy is knowing what you want, what you need, what you do well, and what you may need assistance with doing. This also includes knowing your legal rights, what is best for you, and who to tell what information. Self-advocacy can empower people and give them the access they need to reasonable accommodations and strategies. Let’s talk more about what are some helpful tips for becoming a better self-advocate in the workplace.

First Steps

  1. Work hard and be as productive as possible. If your supervisor knows you are a hard worker and reliable, they will want to work together on figuring out what works best for you and can improve your performance even more. Make sure you do your best at all times and it will feel more comfortable approaching your supervisor about workplace accommodations as well.
  2. Represent yourself well and professionally. In order to show that you are a productive worker, there are usually expectations to follow at your workplace, such as: dressing nicely, getting to work on time or early, keeping on track of your work emails, being respectful and pleasant around coworkers, being helpful, being passionate about your work, asking questions to your supervisors, and keeping them informed of things going on.
  3. Be as helpful as possible! We can’t stress this enough! When anybody asks you to help out or do something, DO IT! Use this as a way to grow and opportunity to serve and help others. If other people feel supported by you, the more likely they will be there to give support to you when you need it as well. It always helps to work in a kind, supportive, and steady work environment.
  4. Be confident! The more you practice being assertive and working on being kind and compassionate to yourself, the more others can see that and feel comfortable coming to you with things and having you as a team member. Confidence is a skill that takes practice, work on that by bettering yourself and working on things you might not be as comfortable with and by getting feedback from supervisors.

self-advocacy-in-workplace

Next steps: What Accommodations are Right for YOU?

  1. First off, you should always be familiar with your legal rights as a person with a disability. Read through and research the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). When you are able to learn that the law really is on your side and here to help, this will help you to feel even more comfortable and confident when approaching supervisors about accommodations. Practicing these conversations is a good idea. You usually do not need to submit documentation when asking for workplace accommodations, but should have this available to you as employers can request that before actually providing the accommodation.
  2. Ask yourself these questions: Does your workplace have everything you need and does this increase your productivity? How well do you communicate with others, what are you most comfortable with and what are areas to improve on in this way? What are your main job duties and tasks? What do you need in order to be the most productive at your workplace? Always remember to focus on your strengths and what you do well.
  3. Be familiar with what accommodations are typically offered for individuals with your condition. A really good website to use is the Job Accommodation Network or askjan.org. This website lists different disabilities – physical, emotional, etc. It then lists examples of reasonable accommodations for each condition and ways to ask for or use these at your workplace. This is a great resource to turn to when you have questions and to better educate yourself and your employers as well. Feel free to check out the website at www.askjan.org or give them a call at 1-800-5267234.
  4. Make your request. Sometimes you do not even need to disclose your actual condition to your employer; there is so much new assistive technology that is constantly used by people with disabilities and without. The choice is yours on disclosing. Be comfortable deciding what you want to do and come up with your own suggestions and solutions before hand so you feel empowered.
  5. Follow up with your written accommodation request. This request should be brief and should also talk to the important information regarding your condition and the current need for accommodations. Make sure to talk about how these reasonable accommodations will assist you in meeting your workplace productivity and goals. If your accommodation request is denied, for whatever reason, continue to work with your supervisor and also with the HR department at your workplace to resolve the matter.

When your reasonable accommodations are approved, continue to use them well and to be productive in your place of employment. Continue to be helpful to your co-workers and supervisors and feel comfortable expressing how things are going. Remember, becoming a skilled self-advocate takes time, practice, and determination. Work hard and great things will come your way, we believe in you, Bulldogs!

Read other posts/resources about Disabilities in the Workplace

Photo source: Unsplash | Joanna Kosinska